Cognition Exploring The Science of the Mind 6th Edition by Daniel Reisberg Test Bank

<< Cognitive Neuroscience The Biology of The Mind 4th Edition By Mangun Ivry Test Bank Clinically Oriented Anatomy 7Th Ed By Agur Dalley Test Bank >>
Product Code: 222
Availability: In Stock
Price: $24.99
Qty:     - OR -   Add to Wish List
Add to Compare

Cognition Exploring The Science of the Mind 6th Edition by Daniel Reisberg Test Bank

Description

WITH ANSWERS
Cognition Exploring The Science of the Mind 6th Edition by Daniel Reisberg Test Bank

Chapter 02: The Neural Basis for Cognition

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Which of the following statements is LEAST likely to be true of a person with Capgras syndrome?
a. She thinks that her mother has been replaced by a look-alike alien.
b. She cannot recognize that her father looks like her father.
c. She also has Alzheimers syndrome.
d. She has no warm sense of familiarity when she sees a close friend.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Explaining Capgras Syndrome

OBJ:   2.1                 MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Some researchers explain Capgras syndrome as
a. a simple failure of visual recognition.
b. the result of a disconnection between a cognitive appraisal and a sense of familiarity.
c. a subtype of schizophrenia.
d. a failure of long-term memory, because patients cannot remember what their own close family members look like.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   The Neural Basis for Capgras Syndrome

OBJ:   2.1                 MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Neuroimaging techniques such as PET suggest a link between Capgras syndrome and abnormalities in all of the following brain regions EXCEPT the
a. prefrontal cortex. c. temporal lobe.
b. amygdala. d. fusiform face area.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   The Neural Basis for Capgras Syndrome

OBJ:   2.1                 MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. For most people, encountering a family member who looks a little bit different will elicit a response like He must have gotten a haircut! However, that same experience will elicit a response like ________ from someone with Capgras yndrome.
a. He lost weight! c. He is an imposter!
b. He is mad at me. d. He looks like a hat!

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   The Neural Basis for Capgras Syndrome

OBJ:   2.1                 MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Capgras syndrome suggests there are two parts to recognition. These parts are
a. factual and familiar. c. visual and factual.
b. factual and emotional. d. visual and auditory.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   What Do We Learn from Capgras Syndrome?

OBJ:   2.1                 MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Capgras syndrome provides an illustration of several important themes in Chapter 2. All of the following are true of Capgras EXCEPT
a. damage to a specific part of the brain is likely to produce specific symptoms.
b. the brain is interconnected so that many systems interact.
c. cognitive disorders often co-occur, such as Alzheimers syndrome and Capgras syndrome.
d. damage to the amygdala will result in an inability to recognize imposters.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   What Do We Learn from Capgras Syndrome?

OBJ:   2.2                 MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Capgras syndrome contributes to our understanding of cognition in each of the following ways EXCEPT the role of
a. the temporal lobe in memory.
b. the amygdala in people without Capgras syndrome.
c. the frontal lobe in schizophrenia.
d. visual area V1.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   What Do We Learn from Capgras Syndrome?

OBJ:   2.2                 MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Capgras syndrome and other cognitive disorders are useful because they
a. provide information about normal cognitive functioning.
b. suggest cognition is an interesting topic.
c. provide evidence that people with Capgras syndrome need medication.
d. show that all brain damage is irreversible.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   What Do We Learn from Capgras Syndrome?

OBJ:   2.2                 MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Which of the following statements about Phineus Gage is FALSE?
a. He had Capgras syndrome.
b. A rod went through his face and head, removing part of his frontal lobe.
c. His personality changed after his trauma.
d. He was able to perform basic cognitive tasks (talking, remembering, etc.) after his trauma.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   The Study of the Brain

OBJ:   2.2                 MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Damage to the brain can be caused in many ways, but in general the damage is referred to as a
a. stroke. c. syndrome.
b. lesion. d. problem.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Data from Neuropsychology

OBJ:   2.2                 MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Among its other functions, the amygdala seems to serve as a(n)
a. important relay station between the eye and occipital cortex.
b. storage location for information received from the skin.
c. emotional evaluator or threat detector.
d. index for locating memories in the brain.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   The Neural Basis for Capgras Syndrome

OBJ:   2.4                 MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Mike has damage to his hindbrain. He is likely to experience problems with which set of behaviors?
a. rhythm of breathing, level of alertness, and posture
b. complex thought and long-term memory
c. planned motor activity
d. perception and visual imagery

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Hindbrain, Midbrain, Forebrain

OBJ:   2.4                 MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Lisa has recently suffered a brain injury. Her symptoms include deficits in coordination and interpretation of pain. Which structure is most likely damaged?
a. primary motor area c. forebrain
b. midbrain d. hindbrain

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Hindbrain, Midbrain, Forebrain

OBJ:   2.4                 MSC:  Applying

 

  1. The cortex makes up the surface of what brain structure?
a. hindbrain c. thalamus
b. midbrain d. forebrain

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Hindbrain, Midbrain, Forebrain

OBJ:   2.4                 MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Damage to the ________ is likely to cause problems with precise eye movements.
a. forebrain c. hindbrain
b. midbrain d. amygdala

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Hindbrain, Midbrain, Forebrain

OBJ:   2.4                 MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Which of the following is included in the limbic system?
a. thalamus c. cerebellum
b. amygdala d. hypothalamus

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Subcortical Structures

OBJ:   2.4                 MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Commissures, including the corpus callosum, are
a. blood vessels that carry blood to all areas of the brain.
b. brain areas associated with various types of sensory information.
c. pockets of oxygen found throughout the brain.
d. thick bundles of fibers that allow communication between the brains hemispheres.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Subcortical Structures

OBJ:   2.4                 MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Most of the brains structures are hidden deep inside the ________, which is the outer, visible layer.
a. cerebellum c. midbrain
b. cortex d. hindbrain

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Hindbrain, Midbrain, Forebrain

OBJ:   2.5                 MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Which of the following structures is NOT visible when viewing an image of an intact brain?
a. cerebellum c. primary motor cortex
b. cortex d. amygdala

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Hindbrain, Midbrain, Forebrain

OBJ:   2.5                 MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Which lobe or cortex is farthest from the cerebellum?
a. frontal c. occipital
b. parietal d. temporal

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Hindbrain, Midbrain, Forebrain

OBJ:   2.5                 MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Which of the following statements about association cortex is FALSE?
a. These areas of the brain are involved in higher-level sensory processing.
b. These areas contain specialized subregions.
c. There are association areas for both sensory and motor areas.
d. The visual association cortex is located in the subcortical parts of the brain.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   The Cerebral Cortex

OBJ:   2.5                 MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Unlike fMRI, TMS can be used to make ________ statements.
a. causal c. scientific
b. important d. functional

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   The Power of Combining Techniques

OBJ:   2.5 | 2.7          MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Lindsie participated in an fMRI experiment. The researchers found high activity levels in visual areas when she was looking at an image and high activity in those same areas when she was ________.
a. sleeping c. drawing the image.
b. imagining the image. d. speaking.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Localization of Function

OBJ:   2.5 | 2.7          MSC:  Applying

 

  1. When an image is projected to the right visual field, the signal will be sent to the ________ hemisphere.
a. right c. visual
b. left d. cortical

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Hindbrain, Midbrain, Forebrain

OBJ:   2.6                 MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Kate has a split brain. Her doctor briefly presents the word hammer to only her left visual field and then asks her what she saw. Which set of responses is Kate most likely to give?
a. She will say she doesnt know what word appeared but she will be able to identify the object with her right hand.
b. She will say she doesnt know what word appeared but she will be able to identify the object with her left hand.
c. She will say she doesnt know what word appeared and she will not be able to identify the object using either hand.
d. She will say hammer.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Lateralization

OBJ:   2.6                 MSC:  Applying

 

  1. The corpus callosum serves what major function?
a. processing sensory information
b. long-term memory
c. communication between hemispheres
d. emotion

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Lateralization

OBJ:   2.6                 MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. A patient might elect to have split-brain surgery, which involves
a. severing the corpus callosum.
b. removing the amygdala.
c. removing one hemisphere of the brain.
d. removing a section of the frontal lobe.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Lateralization

OBJ:   2.6                 MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The corpus callosum is a large
a. muscle. c. commissure.
b. neuron. d. damaged area of the brain.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Lateralization

OBJ:   2.6                 MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Split-brain patients benefit from the procedure in the form of fewer seizures. How has cognitive psychology benefited?
a. This procedure has led to the well-supported notion that someone can be left-brained or right-brained.
b. Research with these patients suggests that there is not significant localization of function in the brain.
c. Research with these patients suggests that someone cannot live without an intact corpus callosum, indicating its importance in survival and functioning.
d. The procedure indicates that you can cause damage to the brain with no adverse cognitive effects.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Lateralization

OBJ:   2.6                 MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) uses a strong magnetic pulse to
a. record the amount of glucose a specific brain region used during a cognitive task.
b. measure the blood flow using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals.
c. produce a temporary disruption to the brain area, and thus brain function, where it is applied.
d. create a detailed map of the different brain areas.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Data from Neuroimaging

OBJ:   2.7                 MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Researchers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) find activity in the fusiform face area (FFA) when participants are viewing faces. This means that FFA
a. is responsible for recognizing faces.
b. is necessary to recognizing faces.
c. activity is correlated with recognizing faces.
d. has no role in recognizing faces.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Data from Neuroimaging

OBJ:   2.7                 MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fMRI
a. are less useful than other types of neuroimaging for the study of brain function.
b. create a three-dimensional representation of the brains tissue.
c. are useful only for studying features on the outer surface of the brain.
d. make self-report data unnecessary.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Data from Neuroimaging

OBJ:   2.7                 MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. A number of techniques have been developed that allow us to examine the moment-by-moment activity levels of specifically defined brain areas. These techniques are called
a. fMRI c. chronometric techniques.
b. neuroimaging techniques. d. psychometric assessment.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Data from Neuroimaging

OBJ:   2.7                 MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. A CT or computerized axial tomography scan
a. can only be performed on a cadaver.
b. uses X-rays to study the living brains anatomy.
c. is primarily useful for measuring blood flow in the brain.
d. can detect the activity taking place in different brain areas in real time.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Data from Neuroimaging

OBJ:   2.7                 MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans show
a. minute details of brain anatomy.
b. what a participant is thinking at the moment the test is taken.
c. brain areas that are currently consuming a particularly high level of glucose.
d. whether a participant is learning something new or remembering prior learning.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Data from Neuroimaging

OBJ:   2.7                 MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Patrick was in a car accident and hit his head on the dashboard. The emergency room doctors are concerned that he may have sustained a traumatic brain injury. Which of the following methods are they most likely to use to confirm or disprove their diagnosis?
a. TMS c. EEG
b. fMRI d. MRI

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Data from Neuroimaging

OBJ:   2.7                 MSC:  Applying

 

  1. The electroencephalogram (EEG) provides an estimate of brain activity by measuring
a. glucose consumption.
b. blood flow.
c. neurotransmitter release.
d. electrical signals produced by neurons.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Data from Electrical Recording

OBJ:   2.7                 MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Researchers have used fMRI to investigate activation in the FFA and the parahippocampal place area (PPA). When participants are shown a picture of a face to one eye and a picture of a house to the other eye (producing binocular rivalry), we expect to see
a. no increase in activation in either the FFA or the PPA relative to a baseline.
b. equal activation in the FFA and the PPA.
c. only activation in the brain region linked to the picture in the dominant eye (e.g., if a picture of a face is presented to the dominant eye, then only the FFA will show increased activation).
d. an increase in activation in the FFA when the participant is consciously aware of the face and similarly increased activation in the PPA when the participant is consciously aware of the house.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   The Power of Combining Techniques

OBJ:   2.7                 MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Dr. Hout has fMRI evidence about the role of the FFA in visual processing. What should he do next?
a. acquire evidence from another method, like CT or TMS
b. assume that the role of the FFA is completely understood
c. nothing; one source of evidence is sufficient.
d. assume his results are flawed and do another fMRI study

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   The Power of Combining Techniques

OBJ:   2.7                 MSC:  Applying

 

  1. The primary motor projection area is located
a. in the cerebellum.
b. in the occipital cortex.
c. toward the rear of the frontal lobe.
d. in the midbrain.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Motor Areas   OBJ:   2.8

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. If a researcher applies mild electric current to a specific area of an animals right hemisphere primary motor projection area, which of the following is likely to happen?
a. a specific movement of a body part on the right side of the animal
b. a specific movement of a body part on the left side of the animal
c. a chaotic movement of the entire animal
d. no movement at all

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Motor Areas   OBJ:   2.8

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. The auditory cortex follows the principle of contralateral control. Thus, the
a. right temporal lobe receives most of its input from the left ear.
b. right temporal lobe receives most of its input from the right ear.
c. right temporal lobe receives equal input from both ears.
d. information received by the right temporal lobe depends on whether the listener favors his or her right or left ear.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Sensory Areas

OBJ:   2.8                 MSC:  Applying

 

  1. The primary motor projection area forms a map of the body and the projections control movement to specific areas of the body. The amount of cortical tissue dedicated to different parts of the body correlates with
a. the size of the body part.
b. the distance of the body part from the brain.
c. the precision of movement for the body part.
d. The cortical area does not vary; it is the same for all body parts.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Sensory Areas

OBJ:   2.8                 MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Olivia has sustained damage to the prefrontal area. As a result, she is most likely to have
a. neglect syndrome.
b. a variety of problems, including problems planning and implementing strategies.
c. difficulties exclusively with memory.
d. primarily language problems.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Association Areas

OBJ:   2.8                 MSC:  Applying

 

  1. A patient with visual agnosia will probably show an inability to
a. remember a list of words heard 1 hour before.
b. detect brief flashes of light.
c. recall the color of familiar objects (e.g., that stop signs are red).
d. identify common objects in plain view.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Association Areas

OBJ:   2.8                 MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Ben and Quinn both have lesions in their left frontal lobes. Ben has trouble producing speech; Quinn has difficulties comprehending speech. Both Ben and Quinn are likely to receive a diagnosis of
a. neglect syndrome. c. agnosia.
b. apraxia. d. aphasia.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Association Areas

OBJ:   2.8                 MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Motor and sensory cortices combined make up what portion of the brain?
a. less than 10% c. just over 50%
b. roughly 25% d. nearly 85%

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Association Areas

OBJ:   2.8                 MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Communication between neurons is ________, while communication within a neuron is ________.
a. electrical; chemical c. electric; neurotransmitter-based
b. chemical; electrical d. simple; difficult

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Neurons and Glia

OBJ:   2.9                 MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. A neuron is
a. a group of cells specialized for a particular type of information storage.
b. one of the fibers connecting the eye to the visual cortex.
c. an individual cell within the nervous system.
d. a region within the brain dedicated to a single function.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Neurons and Glia

OBJ:   2.9                 MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT a primary function of glial cells?
a. provide support for neurons
b. facilitate the development of the nervous system
c. release neurotransmitters
d. clean up waste

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Neurons and Glia

OBJ:   2.9                 MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Once a cell fires, the part of a neuron that transmits information to another location is the
a. dendrite. c. axon.
b. cell body. d. nucleus.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Neurons and Glia

OBJ:   2.9                 MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The ________ contains the machinery necessary to keep the cell alive and functioning properly.
a. cell body c. axon
b. dendrite d. myelin

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Neurons and Glia

OBJ:   2.9                 MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Complete the analogy: Incoming is to outgoing as ________ is to ________.
a. dendrite; cell body c. axon; cell body
b. dendrite; axon d. cell body; axon

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Neurons and Glia

OBJ:   2.9                 MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Which of the following statements about neurons is FALSE?
a. Signals are processed by the cell body of a neuron.
b. A neuron can have many dendrites.
c. Neurons have one basic shape.
d. The axon of one neuron can communicate with the dendrite of another neuron.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Neurons and Glia

OBJ:   2.9                 MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Neuron A communicates with neuron B. The ________ of neuron A forms a synapse with the ________  of neuron B.
a. cell body; soma c. axon terminal; dendrite
b. axon terminal; axon terminal d. soma; dendrite

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Neurons and Glia

OBJ:   2.9 | 2.10        MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. A synapse is
a. a message sent from one neuron to another.
b. part of a neurons cell body.
c. made up of the end of one neurons axon, another neurons receiving membrane, and the gap between these two.
d. the name of the electric signal that occurs when a cell reaches its threshold.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   The Synapse  OBJ:   2.9

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. A neurons initial, internal response to an incoming signal can vary in size. The ultimate, external response of the cell, however, does not vary in size. If the signal is sent, it is always of the same magnitude. This effect is called the
a. whole-firing potential. c. uniform response law.
b. all-or-none law. d. threshold potential.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   The Synapse  OBJ:   2.9

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Neuron X sends a signal that is picked up and processed by Neuron Y. This between-cell communication occurs via
a. chemical transmission between Neuron X and Neuron Y.
b. electrical stimulation of Neuron Y by Neuron X.
c. fibers that connect Neuron X and Neuron Y.
d. We dont know how it happens.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   The Synapse  OBJ:   2.10

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. One of the disadvantages of synaptic communication is that it takes time for chemicals to pass from one side of the synapse to another. Which of the following is a benefit of synaptic transmission?
a. It allows our nervous system to compare multiple signals from many sources.
b. Chemicals in our food can be broken down to influence between-cell communication.
c. It is simple, because each neuron can only receive signals from a single neuron.
d. Chemicals are more reliable than electrical energy.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   The Synapse  OBJ:   2.10

MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. At the synapse, a neurotransmitter is released by the ________ and could bind to the ________.
a. vesicle; presynaptic membrane
b. vesicle; receptor site
c. receptor; presynaptic membrane
d. receptor; vesicle

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   The Synapse  OBJ:   2.10

MSC:  Understanding

 

ESSAY

 

  1. Describe Capgras syndrome and one possible explanation (physiological or cognitive) for the disorder. What does this disorder tell us about the interactive nature of the brain?

 

ANS:

Answers will vary.

 

DIF:    Difficult         REF:   The Neural Basis for Capgras Syndrome

OBJ:   2.1                 MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. As it pertains to the development and testing of theories, what are the benefits of studying neuropsychology and neuroscience for cognitive psychologists?

 

ANS:

Answers will vary.

 

DIF:    Moderate        REF:   The Power of Combining Techniques

OBJ:   2.2 | 2.7          MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Is it fair to say that someone is left-brained or right-brained? Why or why not? Give examples to support your answer.

 

ANS:

Answers will vary.

 

DIF:    Moderate        REF:   Lateralization                                  OBJ:   2.3 | 2.4

MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Explain the relevance of split-brain patients in psychology by answering the following questions.
  2. What area of the brain is lesioned in these patients? Why do these patients elect to have this surgery?
  3. How does behavior change after the surgery? How does it stay the same?
  4. What have we learned about the brain and behavior as a result of this procedure?

 

ANS:

Answers will vary.

 

DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Lateralization                                  OBJ:   2.6

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Compare and contrast the use of fMRI and TMS and describe their applications in psychology. What sort of information does each approach give us? Which technique can be used to make causal statements about the link between brain activity and behavior?

 

ANS:

Answers will vary.

 

DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Data from Neuroimaging                OBJ:   2.7

MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Evaluate the use of fMRI as a way to gather information about activity in the brain. What are the advantages and shortcomings of this approach?

 

ANS:

Answers will vary.

 

DIF:    Moderate        REF:   Association Areas                           OBJ:   2.7

MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Judy has sustained damage to her visual association area, but not her primary association area. Describe the behavioral changes you would expect to see, given this trauma. What behaviors or mental processes would not be affected?

 

ANS:

Answers will vary.

 

DIF:    Moderate        REF:   Association Areas                           OBJ:   2.8

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Describe the relationship between cortical area in primary somatosensory cortex and corresponding surface area of the body part. Name two parts of the body that have surprisingly large cortical representations and two that have small representations.

 

ANS:

Answers will vary.

 

DIF:    Moderate        REF:   Association Areas                           OBJ:   2.8

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Explain how a signal would be processed and sent through a neuron. Include in your answer a description of the relevant components in the cell.

 

ANS:

Answers will vary.

 

DIF:    Moderate        REF:   Neurons and Glia                           OBJ:   2.9

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Imagine that Neuron X communicates with Neuron Y. Describe the process by which Neuron X can send a message to Neuron Y. What possible effects will this signal have on the firing of Neuron Y?

 

ANS:

Answers will vary.

 

DIF:    Moderate        REF:   Neurons and Glia                           OBJ:   2.10

MSC:  Applying

 

Chapter 14: Conscious Thought, Unconscious Thought

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. A great deal of behind-the-scenes activity is necessary to make possible intellectual achievements like thinking and remembering. This behind-the-scenes activity is referred to by psychologists as
a. nuts-and-bolts work. c. subconscious production.
b. the cognitive unconscious. d. running the program.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   The Cognitive Unconscious

OBJ:   14.1       &n

Write a review

Your Name:


Your Review: Note: HTML is not translated!

Rating: Bad           Good

Enter the code in the box below:



 

Once the order is placed, the order will be delivered to your email less than 24 hours, mostly within 4 hours. 

If you have questions, you can contact us here