Mastering The World Of Psychology 5th Edition by Samuel E. Wood Test Bank

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Mastering The World Of Psychology 5th Edition by Samuel E. Wood Test Bank

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Mastering The World Of Psychology 5th Edition by Samuel E. Wood Test Bank

Test Bank for Wood 5e

Chapter 2: Biology and Behavior

 

 

Multiple Choice

 

  1. EEG stands for _____
  2. a) Electrical Encoded Graph.
  3. b) encoded
  4. c) electroencephalogram.
  5. d) electro energy

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 39

Textbook LO 2.1: What does the electroencephalogram (EEG) reveal about the brain?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: The EEG and the Microelectrode

 

  1. Which of the following imaging techniques would be best for studying the activity of one single neuron?
  2. a) CT scan
  3. b) PET scan
  4. c) microelectrodes
  5. d) magnetoencephalography

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 39

Textbook LO 2.1: What does the electroencephalogram (EEG) reveal about the brain?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: The EEG and the Microelectrode

 

  1. The _____ can monitor the activity of a single neuron, or _____ activity within it.
  2. a) microelectrode; stimulate
  3. b) EEG; inhibit
  4. c) microwire; stimulate
  5. d) PET scan; stop

Answer: a A microelectrode is a small wire that can monitor electrical activity in or stimulate activity within a single neuron.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 3940

Textbook LO 2.1: What does the electroencephalogram (EEG) reveal about the brain?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: The EEG and the Microelectrode

 

  1. A record of brain-wave activity is called a (an) _____
  2. a) PET scan.
  3. b) CAT scan.
  4. c) EMG.
  5. d) EEG.

Answer: d The EEG, electroencephalogram, is a record of brain-wave activity.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 3940

Textbook LO 2.1: What does the electroencephalogram (EEG) reveal about the brain?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: The EEG and the Microelectrode

 

  1. When wanting a record of electrical activity in the brain in the form of brain waves, a (an) _____ machine would be used.
  2. a) electroencephalogram
  3. b) microelectrode
  4. c) computerized X-ray
  5. d) electrowave spectral imager

Answer: a The electroencephalogram machine makes a record of electrical activity in the brain.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 39

Textbook LO 2.1: What does the electroencephalogram (EEG) reveal about the brain?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: The EEG and the Microelectrode

 

  1. Dr. Solomon wants a record of the electrical activity in her patients brain during an epileptic seizure. She would schedule the patient for a _____ appointment.
  2. a) magnetic resonance imaging
  3. b) electroencephalograph
  4. c) positron-emission tomography
  5. d) microelectrode testing

Answer: b The electroencephalograph provides a record of electrical activity in the brain.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 39

Textbook LO 2.1: What does the electroencephalogram (EEG) reveal about the brain?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: The EEG and the Microelectrode

 

  1. Eight-year-old Daria was having some disturbances in her sleep, so her parents took her to a Childrens Hospital to undergo various tests. She recalls sleeping in the hospital room with a bunch of wires stuck to her scalp. What technique was used in Darias sleep study?
  2. a) EEG
  3. b) MEG
  4. c) PET
  5. d) SPECT

Answer: a The EEG, electroencephalograph, involves the placement of wires on the scalp and is used to measure brain wave activity during sleep.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 40

Textbook LO 2.1: What does the electroencephalogram (EEG) reveal about the brain?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: The EEG and the Microelectrode

 

  1. Dr. Solomon wants to identify the precise neuronal origin of her patients epileptic seizures. She will be using a (an) _____ to determine this.
  2. a) iEEG
  3. b) fMRI
  4. c) iPET
  5. d) EEG

Answer: a The iEEG, intracranial electroencephalogram, enables neurologists to pinpoint the precise neuronal origin of seizures.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 40

Textbook LO 2.1: What does the electroencephalogram (EEG) reveal about the brain?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: The EEG and the Microelectrode

 

  1. _____ is a brain-scanning technique that uses a rotating, computerized X-ray tube to produce cross-sectional images of the structures of the brain.
  2. a) Positron-emission tomography
  3. b) Computerized axial tomography
  4. c) Functional magnetic resonance imaging
  5. d) Magnetic resonance imaging

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 40

Textbook LO 2.2: How do researchers use imaging techniques to study the nervous system?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: Imaging Techniques

 

  1. Which of the following uses X-rays to detect various abnormalities of the brain including injury sites, tumors, and evidence of recent strokes?
  2. a) intracranial EEG
  3. b) magnetic resonance imaging
  4. c) computerized axial tomography
  5. d) electroencephalogram

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 40

Textbook LO 2.2: How do researchers use imaging techniques to study the nervous system?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: Imaging Techniques

 

  1. The _____ is a diagnostic scanning technique that produces high-resolution images of the structures of the brain.
  2. a) MRI
  3. b) EEG
  4. c) PET
  5. d) X-ray

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 40

Textbook LO 2.2: How do researchers use imaging techniques to study the nervous system?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: Imaging Techniques

 

  1. The _____ maps patterns of blood flow, oxygen use, and glucose consumption in the brain.
  2. a) CT scan, computer axial tomography
  3. b) MRI, magnetic resonance imaging
  4. c) EEG, electroencephalogram
  5. d) PET scan, positron-emission tomography

Answer: d

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 40

Textbook LO 2.2: How do researchers use imaging techniques to study the nervous system?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: Imaging Techniques

 

  1. The iEEG, intracranial electroencephalogram would be most appropriate for studying _____
  2. a) brain waves during sleep.
  3. b) abnormalities in brain structure.
  4. c) glucose and oxygen uptake in the brain.
  5. d) the activity of a single neuron.

Answer: d The iEEG allows neurologists to pinpoint the precise neuronal origin of activity.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 3940

Textbook LO 2.2: How do researchers use imaging techniques to study the nervous system?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: Imaging Techniques

 

  1. The CT scan would be a good choice to look for which of the following?
  2. a) a tumor in the brain
  3. b) abnormal brain activity
  4. c) a sleep disorder
  5. d) individual neuron bundles

Answer: b Computerized axial tomography (CT) scans reveal structures in the brain, including tumors.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 40

Textbook LO 2.2: How do researchers use imaging techniques to study the nervous system?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: Imaging Techniques

 

  1. Diffusion tensor imaging would be the best choice to examine _____
  2. a) individual neuron bundles.
  3. b) a tumor in the brain.
  4. c) a sleep disorder.
  5. d) glucose uptake in the brain.

Answer: a Diffusion tensor imaging, DTI, enables researchers to examine individual neuron bundles.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Difficult

Page Ref: 41

Textbook LO 2.2: How do researchers use imaging techniques to study the nervous system?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: Imaging Techniques

 

  1. Conan brought his mother to the hospital when he noticed she couldnt move one side of her body and had great difficulty speaking. The physician informed Conan that his mother may have had a stroke. He wanted to confirm this speculation by using an imaging device that utilized X-rays. Which of the following was used on Conans mother?
  2. a) MRI
  3. b) CT scan
  4. c) EEG
  5. d) fMRI

Answer: b CT scans use X-rays to reveal cross-sectional images of brain structure that can reveal evidence of recent strokes.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 40

Textbook LO 2.2: How do researchers use imaging techniques to study the nervous system?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: Imaging Techniques

 

  1. Lucinda needs to find the location of her patients tumor, but she does not want to expose the patient to X-rays. Which of the following imaging technologies would be best suited for this task?
  2. a) a microelectrode
  3. b) a CT scan
  4. c) a MRI
  5. d) an EEG

Answer: c MRIs provide clearer and more detailed images of the brain without exposing people to X-rays.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 40

Textbook LO 2.2: How do researchers use imaging techniques to study the nervous system?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: Imaging Techniques

 

  1. RaeAnn is a researcher who studies the effects of drug use in humans. She wants to understand the action of particular drugs on the brain. Which of the following imaging techniques will allow her to engage in this type of research?
  2. a) CT scan
  3. b) MRI
  4. c) PET
  5. d) DTI

Answer: c PET scans can show activity in the brain and reveal the effects of drugs on brain activity.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Difficult

Page Ref: 40

Textbook LO 2.2: How do researchers use imaging techniques to study the nervous system?, APA LO 3.2e

Topic: Imaging Techniques

 

  1. _____ are specialized cells that conduct impulses through the nervous system.
  2. a) Gametes
  3. b) Neurons
  4. c) Dendrites
  5. d) Axons

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 41

Textbook LO 2.3: What does each part of the neuron do?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: The Structure of the Neuron

 

  1. The body of the cell that carries out the life-sustaining functions of the neuron and contains its nucleus is called the _____
  2. a) soma.
  3. b) dendrite.
  4. c) axon.
  5. d) bud.

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 41

Textbook LO 2.3: What does each part of the neuron do?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: The Structure of the Neuron

 

  1. The function of the neurons axon is to _____
  2. a) carry messages to other cells.
  3. b) regulate the neurons life processes.
  4. c) receive messages from neighboring neurons.
  5. d) insulate against leakage of electrical impulses.

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 4142

Textbook LO 2.3: What does each part of the neuron do?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: The Structure of the Neuron

Item Analysis: % correct 67 a = 67 b = 2 c = 35 6 = 53 r = .41

 

  1. _____ receive messages from other neurons and _____ send messages to other neurons.
  2. a) Axons; dendrites
  3. b) Axons; soma
  4. c) Soma; glial cells
  5. d) Dendrites; axons

Answer: d

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 4142

Textbook LO 2.3: What does each part of the neuron do?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: The Structure of the Neuron

Item Analysis: % correct 67 a = 67 b = 2 c = 35 6 = 53 r = .41

 

  1. The part of a neuron that extends, tail-like, from the soma, and releases neurotransmitters into the synapse is the _____
  2. a) dendrite.
  3. b) glial cell.
  4. c) axon.
  5. d) terminal bud.

Answer: c The axon extends from the cell body. It has a slender, tail-like shape, and releases neurotransmitters from its axon terminal.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 42

Textbook LO 2.3: What does each part of the neuron do?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: The Structure of the Neuron

 

  1. Looking like leafless branches of a tree, the _____ are the primary receivers of signals from other neurons, although the _____ also receives signals directly.
  2. a) axon; dendrites
  3. b) dendrites; soma
  4. c) soma; dendrites
  5. d) dendrites; axon

Answer: b The dendrites, which branch off from the cell body, are the primary receivers of signals from other neurons. The soma, or cell body, also receives signals directly.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 41

Textbook LO 2.3: What does each part of the neuron do?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: The Structure of the Neuron

 

  1. If the dendrites of a neuron were not able to perform their function, _____
  2. a) the myelin would shrink.
  3. b) no signals would be transmitted from the neuron.
  4. c) no signals would be received from the neuron.
  5. d) some neural signals would still be received by the neuron.

Answer: d Because the soma, or cell body, also receives some signals directly, some neural signals would still be received by this neuron.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 4142

Textbook LO 2.3: What does each part of the neuron do?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: The Structure of the Neuron

 

  1. If the axon of a neuron were not able to perform its function, _____
  2. a) the neuron would receive no signals.
  3. b) the neuron would send no signals.
  4. c) the neuron would not reproduce.
  5. d) the neuron signals would become erratic.

Answer: b It is only by the release of neurotransmitters from the axons terminal that signals are transmitted by neurons.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 4142

Textbook LO 2.3: What does each part of the neuron do?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: The Structure of the Neuron

 

  1. Examining the end of an axon, we would see that _____
  2. a) it has many branches, each of which ends in an axon terminal.
  3. b) it has only one terminal.
  4. c) it touches a dendrite or soma of another neuron.
  5. d) it terminates in a myelin sheath.

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Difficult

Page Ref: 42

Textbook LO 2.3: What does each part of the neuron do?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: The Structure of the Neuron

 

  1. Nodes of _____ are gaps in the _____ that coat some axons.
  2. a) myelin; glia
  3. b) Ranvier; myelin
  4. c) membrane; sheath
  5. d) axons; synaptic fluid

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Difficult

Page Ref: 44

Textbook LO 2.3: What does each part of the neuron do?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: The Structure of the Neuron

 

  1. Tony suffers from a disease in which myelin is progressively lost. Tonys axons will increasingly lack _____
  2. a) neurotransmitters.
  3. b) signals.
  4. c) insulation.
  5. d) fluid.

Answer: c Myelin is the white, waxy, coating on axons that acts as an insulator.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 44

Textbook LO 2.3: What does each part of the neuron do?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: The Structure of the Neuron

 

  1. The tiny gap between an axons terminals and the dendrites or soma of another neuron is called the _____
  2. a) node of Ranvier.
  3. b) myelin gap.
  4. c) synaptic cleft.
  5. d) neural space.

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 4243

Textbook LO 2.3: What does each part of the neuron do?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: The Structure of the Neuron

 

  1. A presynaptic neuron is the one that is _____ a signal to another neuron.
  2. a) receiving
  3. b) sending
  4. c) coding
  5. d) inhibiting

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 43

Textbook LO 2.4: How do neurous transmit messages through the nervous system?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Communication between Neurons

 

  1. When a neuron is at rest, it carries a _____ electrical potential (charge).
  2. a) slightly positive
  3. b) slightly negative
  4. c) neutral
  5. d) massively negative

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 43

Textbook LO 2.4: How do neurous transmit messages through the nervous system?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Communication between Neurons

 

  1. The sudden reversal of a neurons resting potential is called a(n) _____ potential and initiates the _____ of a neuron.
  2. a) firing; action
  3. b) signaling; firing
  4. c) action; firing
  5. d) positive; discharge

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 43

Textbook LO 2.4: How do neurous transmit messages through the nervous system?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Communication between Neurons

 

  1. Immediately after firing, a neuron cannot fire for 1 to 2 milliseconds. This is called the _____ period.
  2. a) discharged
  3. b) resting
  4. c) refractory
  5. d) potential

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 43

Textbook LO 2.4: How do neurous transmit messages through the nervous system?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Communication between Neurons

 

  1. A neuron has received a signal, causing ion channels to open in the cell membrane, letting positively charged ions flow in. This has caused the membrane potential to change suddenly from 70 to +50 millivolts. This will cause a (an) _____ to occur.
  2. a) resting state
  3. b) action potential
  4. c) negative charge
  5. d) positive charge

Answer: b The sudden reversal of the resting potential of 70 millivolts to a positive value of +50 millivolts that occurs when ion channels openallowing positively charged ions to flow in through the cell membranecreates an action potential.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 43

Textbook LO 2.4: How do neurous transmit messages through the nervous system?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Communication between Neurons

 

  1. When a neuron carries the electrical potential of _____ millivolts, it is in the state called _____
  2. a) 70; resting potential.
  3. b) +50; refractory period.
  4. c) 50; resting potential.
  5. d) 30; refractory period.

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Difficult

Page Ref: 43

Textbook LO 2.4: How do neurous transmit messages through the nervous system?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Communication between Neurons

 

  1. The strength of the brains response to a weak or strong stimulus is a result of _____
  2. a) how many and how fast neurons fire.
  3. b) the all or none rule.
  4. c) how many millivolts the neuron has.
  5. d) whether action potential occurs.

Answer: a The all or none rule states that neurons either fire or dont fire. This determines whether a response takes place or does not take place. On the other hand, the strength of that response is determined by the number of neurons that fire and/or how fast they fire.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Difficult

Page Ref: 44

Textbook LO 2.4: How do neurous transmit messages through the nervous system?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Communication between Neurons

 

  1. The most important factor in speeding action potential on its way is the fatty, white coating wrapped around most axons. This is called the _____
  2. a) node of Ranvier.
  3. b) myelin sheath.
  4. c) synaptic fluid.
  5. d) sclerotic coating.

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 44

Textbook LO 2.4: How do neurous transmit messages through the nervous system?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Communication between Neurons

 

  1. Multiple sclerosis results in loss of coordination, jerky movement, muscular weakness, and speech disturbance through the deterioration of _____
  2. a) axons.
  3. b) neurons.
  4. c) myelin.
  5. d) neural membranes.

Answer: c Multiple sclerosis is a disease involving deterioration of the myelin sheaths of neurons, which results in the symptoms described.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 44

Textbook LO 2.4: How do neurous transmit messages through the nervous system?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Communication between Neurons

 

  1. The myelin sheath and nodes of Ranvier are important because they _____
  2. a) protect the neuron.
  3. b) speed neural impulses.
  4. c) create action potential.
  5. d) prevent refractory periods.

Answer: b The myelin sheath, and the gaps in it, called nodes of Ranvier, are important because they speed the impulse traveling down the axon so it is up to 100 times faster than in axons without myelin sheaths.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 44

Textbook LO 2.4: How do neurous transmit messages through the nervous system?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Communication between Neurons

 

  1. Which of the following are tiny sacs in the axon terminal that hold chemicals that are released into the synapse?
  2. a) synaptic vesicles
  3. b) synaptic nodes
  4. c) terminal buttons
  5. d) synaptic gaps

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 44

Textbook LO 2.5: How do neurotransmitters work?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Neurotransmitters

Item Analysis: % correct 65 a = 65 b = 22 c = 10 d = 3 r = .36

 

  1. A chemical found in the sacs within an axon terminal which, when released, has an effect on a nearby neuron is called a _____
  2. a) glial cell.
  3. b) neurotransmitter.
  4. c) precursor cell.
  5. d) synapse.

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 44

Textbook LO 2.5: How do neurotransmitters work?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Neurotransmitters

Item Analysis: % correct 74 a = 4 b = 74 c = 4 d = 18 r = .34

 

  1. When a(n) _____ arrives at the axon terminal, it causes the release of neurotransmitters.
  2. a) precursor
  3. b) receptor
  4. c) action potential
  5. d) node of Ranvier

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 44

Textbook LO 2.5: How do neurotransmitters work?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Neurotransmitters

 

  1. Neurotransmitters have distinct molecular shapes; so do the _____ they bind to.
  2. a) myelin sheaths
  3. b) presynaptic neurons
  4. c) vesicles
  5. d) receptors

Answer: d

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 44

Textbook LO 2.5: How do neurotransmitters work?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Neurotransmitters

 

  1. Excitatory neurotransmitters influence the receiving neuron to _____, while inhibitory neurotransmitters influence the receiving neuron to _____
  2. a) fire; not fire.
  3. b) not fire; fire.
  4. c) move; not move.
  5. d) not move; move.

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 45

Textbook LO 2.5: How do neurotransmitters work?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Neurotransmitters

 

  1. Reuptake refers to the process by which neurotransmitters in the synaptic cleft are _____
  2. a) sent back into receptors again.
  3. b) moved back into their axon terminal.
  4. c) broken apart.
  5. d) absorbed by the receiving neuron.

Answer: b When a neurotransmitter molecule is returned to the axon terminal, the process is called reuptake.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 45

Textbook LO 2.5: How do neurotransmitters work?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Neurotransmitters

 

  1. Running to class, _____ is causing muscle fibers in your leg to contract so you can move, and it will stimulate the neurons you need for learning new information.
  2. a) serotonin
  3. b) dopamine
  4. c) endorphin
  5. d) acetylcholine

Answer: d Acetylcholine causes skeletal muscle fiber to contract so you can move. It is also involved in stimulating the neurons involved in learning new information.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 46

Textbook LO 2.5: How do neurotransmitters work?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Neurotransmitters

 

  1. You just accomplished a goal and rewarded yourself with a delicious treat. The pleasant feelings that result from these behaviors are made possible by the release of _____
  2. a) acetylcholine.
  3. b) GABA.
  4. c) dopamine.
  5. d) epinephrine.

Answer: c Dopamine is associated with reinforcement and pleasure.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 46

Textbook LO 2.5: How do neurotransmitters work?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Neurotransmitters

 

  1. You just took a tumble and your arm really hurts. You are wishing your brain would release a lot of _____ to help relieve the pain.
  2. a) acetylcholine
  3. b) dopamine
  4. c) serotonin
  5. d) endorphins

Answer: d Endorphins provide relief from pain.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 46

Textbook LO 2.5: How do neurotransmitters work?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Neurotransmitters

 

  1. Researchers have identified about _____ substances that are made in our body and brain that act as neurotransmitters.
  2. a) 10
  3. b) 1,000
  4. c) 100
  5. d) 20

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 45

Textbook LO 2.5: How do neurotransmitters work?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Neurotransmitters

 

  1. Each neuron may have synapses with _____ other neurons.
  2. a) two or three
  3. b) thousands of
  4. c) up to ten
  5. d) no more than 100

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 45

Textbook LO 2.5: How do neurotransmitters work?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Neurotransmitters

 

  1. Whether a neuron fires or not depends on _____
  2. a) whether it is an excitatory neuron.
  3. b) the sum of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters it receives.
  4. c) what type of neurotransmitter the neuron makes.
  5. d) whether the neuron is myelinated or not.

Answer: b The same neuron may receive signals that are inhibitory and signals that are excitatory. Whether it will fire or not fire depends on whether there are more inhibitory, or more excitatory signals.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 45

Textbook LO 2.5: How do neurotransmitters work?, APA LO 5.1b

Topic: Neurotransmitters

 

  1. All of the nerves outside your spinal cord and brain make up the _____
  2. a) central nervous system.
  3. b) sympathetic nervous system.
  4. c) sensory nervous system.
  5. d) peripheral nervous system.

Answer: d

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 47

Textbook LO 2.6: What are the structures and functions of the peripheral nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Peripheral Nervous System

 

  1. Sensory and motor nerves are part of the _____ nervous system.
  2. a) somatic
  3. b) autonomic
  4. c) sympathetic
  5. d) parasympathetic

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 47

Textbook LO 2.6: What are the structures and functions of the peripheral nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Peripheral Nervous System

 

  1. You have a great deal of conscious control over the nerves of the _____ nervous system, but not over the nerves of the _____ nervous system.
  2. a) somatic; autonomic.
  3. b) autonomic; somatic.
  4. c) peripheral; autonomic.
  5. d) central nervous system; peripheral nervous system.

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 47

Textbook LO 2.6: What are the structures and functions of the peripheral nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Peripheral Nervous System

 

  1. The two divisions of the autonomic nervous system are the _____ and the _____
  2. a) somatic; peripheral.
  3. b) sympathetic; parasympathetic.
  4. c) central; peripheral.
  5. d) brain; spinal cord.

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 48

Textbook LO 2.6: What are the structures and functions of the peripheral nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Peripheral Nervous System

 

  1. Jerry is having difficulty with the motor nerves in his leg. His problem is in the _____ nervous system.
  2. a) autonomic
  3. b) somatic
  4. c) central
  5. d) muscle

Answer: b The somatic nervous system controls skeletal muscles.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 47

Textbook LO 2.6: What are the structures and functions of the peripheral nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Peripheral Nervous System

 

  1. Justin is walking down the street and a car backfires. He drops to the ground, sure it is a drive-by shooting. Justins _____ nervous system just kicked into high gear.
  2. a) somatic
  3. b) parasympathetic
  4. c) sympathetic
  5. d) peripheral

Answer: c The sympathetic nervous system activates in response to stress, threat, and emergency.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 48

Textbook LO 2.6: What are the structures and functions of the peripheral nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Peripheral Nervous System

 

  1. Malcolm is studying alone in his room when he hears a loud noise downstairs. His heart rate and respiration speed up. He wonders if a burglar has entered the house. When he looks downstairs, he sees that his cat just knocked over a plant. He begins to relax and his heart rate and breathing slow down. Which part of his nervous system is working to return him to a normal state?
  2. a) spinal cord
  3. b) somatic nervous system
  4. c) parasympathetic nervous system
  5. d) central nervous system

Answer: c The parasympathetic nervous system works to return the body to its normal state once an emergency is over or threat is past.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 48

Textbook LO 2.6: What are the structures and functions of the peripheral nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Peripheral Nervous System

 

  1. Mekalas sympathetic nervous system has been activated. Which of the following is true?
  2. a) Her digestion sped up.
  3. b) Her pupils dilated.
  4. c) Her heart rate slowed down.
  5. d) The blood flow to her internal organs increased.

Answer: b The sympathetic nervous system prepares us for fight or flight by slowing digestion, increasing heart rate, increasing blood flow to skeletal muscles, and dilating our pupils.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 48

Textbook LO 2.6: What are the structures and functions of the peripheral nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Peripheral Nervous System

 

  1. Michael notices that every time he gets what he calls an adrenalin rush, his heart rate and pulse quicken and he feels a surge of energy. He also notices that lately it takes his body longer than normal to return to feeling calm and normal. What might explain Michaels delay in coming down from his adrenalin rush?
  2. a) His sympathetic nervous system might be too slow.
  3. b) Michaels parasympathetic nervous system may not be activating as quickly as usual.
  4. c) Michaels somatic nervous system might be interfering.
  5. d) Michaels parasympathetic nervous system may be overly active.

Answer: b The parasympathetic nervous system calms us down after sympathetic nervous system activation. Michaels is taking a bit longer to activate.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Difficult

Page Ref: 48

Textbook LO 2.6: What are the structures and functions of the peripheral nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Peripheral Nervous System

 

  1. Tashas sympathetic nervous system is not working. Which of the following would be a likely result?
  2. a) Tasha is experiencing an excess of flight or fight response.
  3. b) Tashas digestion will be constantly slowed down.
  4. c) Tashas heart will not speed up when she is in an emergency situation.
  5. d) Tasha will develop health problems from chronic stress.

Answer: c The sympathetic nervous system causes the heart rate to increase as part of our emergency response. Without a functioning sympathetic nervous system, Tashas heart would not speed up, even when she perceives a threat or emergency.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Difficult

Page Ref: 48

Textbook LO 2.6: What are the structures and functions of the peripheral nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Peripheral Nervous System

 

  1. The central nervous system consists of the _____
  2. a) parasympathetic and sympathetic divisions.
  3. b) brain and spinal cord.
  4. c) muscles and glands.
  5. d) sense organs and sensory neurons.

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 47

Textbook LO 2.7: What are the structures and functions of the central nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Central Nervous System

Item Analysis:

% correct 77 a = 17 b = 77 c = 0 d = 6 r = .24

% correct 82 a = 16 b = 82 c = 1 d = 2 r = .32

 

  1. The long bundle of neurons that carries messages to and from the body to the brain and is responsible for fast, life-saving reflexes is called the _____
  2. a) spinal cord.
  3. b) brain.
  4. c) reflex arc.
  5. d) interneuron.

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 49

Textbook LO 2.7: What are the structures and functions of the central nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Central Nervous System

Item Analysis: % correct 89 a = 89 b = 0 c = 2 d = 9 r = .31

 

  1. Rolandito touched a hot radiator and instantly pulled his hand away. The neurons responsible for this protective reflex are the _____
  2. a) brain, spinal cord, and interneurons.
  3. b) sensory, interneurons, and motor neurons.
  4. c) somatic, autonomic, and parasympathetic neurons.
  5. d) automatic, reflexive, and sympathetic neurons.

Answer: b This type of reflex involves only sensory neurons that sense the heat, and interneurons in the spinal cord that send the message to motor neurons that retract the hand.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 49

Textbook LO 2.7: What are the structures and functions of the central nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Central Nervous System

 

  1. Why do many reflexes, such as pulling your hand away from a hot iron, happen so quickly?
  2. a) They involve the neurotransmitter GABA rather than dopamine.
  3. b) The message involved does not have to go all the way to the brain.
  4. c) The speed of processing is faster in the frontal lobes than in the occipital lobes.
  5. d) The path that reflexes follow to the brain is direct and does not involve any neurotransmitters.

Answer: b Such reflexive movement is accomplished by communication from a sensory neuron to an interneuron in the spinal cord and back to a motor neuron. It does not travel to the brain.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Difficult

Page Ref: 49

Textbook LO 2.7: What are the structures and functions of the central nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Central Nervous System

Item Analysis: % correct 49 a = 17 b = 49 c = 14 d = 21 r = .51

 

  1. Heart rate, respiration, blood pressure and other functions vital to maintain life are controlled by the _____
  2. a) hindbrain.
  3. b) cerebellum.
  4. c) midbrain.
  5. d) limbic system.

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 49

Textbook LO 2.7: What are the structures and functions of the central nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Central Nervous System

 

  1. Tanae was drowsy, but when she heard her child call out, she felt immediately wide awake and alert. A part of her brain that plays a crucial role in her arousal level and attention is the _____
  2. a) medulla.
  3. b) pons.
  4. c) cerebellum.
  5. d) reticular formation.

Answer: d The reticular formation plays a crucial role in arousal and attention.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 49

Textbook LO 2.7: What are the structures and functions of the central nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Central Nervous System

 

  1. Hunter was in a car accident and sustained damage to his cerebellum from a whiplash injury. Which problem would he be most likely to experience after the accident?
  2. a) trouble speaking
  3. b) being in a coma
  4. c) breathing and heart problems
  5. d) problems coordinating his movements

Answer: d The cerebellum coordinates muscle movement, allowing us to make smooth, skilled movements.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 4950

Textbook LO 2.7: What are the structures and functions of the central nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Central Nervous System

 

  1. Without the _____ in your midbrain, you could not ride a bike without giving each movement conscious thought.
  2. a) substantia nigra
  3. b) thalamus
  4. c) limbic system
  5. d) pons

Answer: a The substantia nigra, located in the midbrain, controls our unconscious motor actionsthose motor patterns that are habitual and we can do without thinking.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 51

Textbook LO 2.7: What are the structures and functions of the central nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Central Nervous System

 

  1. Which of the following brain structures is involved in regulating hunger, thirst, temperature, and sexual behavior?
  2. a) pons
  3. b) thalamus
  4. c) amygdala
  5. d) hypothalamus

Answer: d

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 51

Textbook LO 2.7: What are the structures and functions of the central nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Central Nervous System

 

  1. The _____ is heavily involved in the learning of fear responses.
  2. a) hypothalamus
  3. b) amygdala
  4. c) thalamus
  5. d) pons

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 51

Textbook LO 2.7: What are the structures and functions of the central nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Central Nervous System

 

  1. Trams hippocampus was damaged by encephalitis. Which of the following would be true?
  2. a) Tram would not be able to remember anything.
  3. b) Tram would become angry and aggressive.
  4. c) Tram would have difficulty forming new memories.
  5. d) Tram would have difficulty with her vision.

Answer: c The hippocampus plays a central role in memory formation. Memories already formed before the hippocampus was damaged would stay intact.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Difficult

Page Ref: 5152

Textbook LO 2.7: What are the structures and functions of the central nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Central Nervous System

 

  1. The _____ is the part of the brain where cognitive and voluntary motor functions are controlled.
  2. a) hindbrain
  3. b) midbrain
  4. c) limbic system
  5. d) forebrain

Answer: d

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 51

Textbook LO 2.7: What are the structures and functions of the central nervous system?, APA LO 5.1a

Topic: The Central Nervous System

 

  1. The right and left halves of the cerebrum are called the _____
  2. a) cerebral hemispheres.
  3. b) corpus callosi.
  4. c) cerebral halves.
  5. d) cerebral lobes.

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 52

Textbook LO 2.8: What are the components of the cerebrum?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: Components of the Cerebrum

 

  1. The right and left halves of Shawnas cerebrum can no longer communicate with each other because her _____ was destroyed.
  2. a) thalamus
  3. b) cortex
  4. c) corpus callosum
  5. d) corpus cerebrum

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 52

Textbook LO 2.8: What are the components of the cerebrum?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: Components of the Cerebrum

 

  1. The area of the brain primarily responsible for higher mental processes such as thinking and language is the cerebral _____
  2. a) callosum.
  3. b) cortex.
  4. c) cerebellum.
  5. d) white matter.

Answer: d

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 53

Textbook LO 2.8: What are the components of the cerebrum?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: Components of the Cerebrum

 

  1. Gray matter gets its color from _____ whereas white matter gets its color from _____
  2. a) cell bodies; dendrites.
  3. b) myelinated axons; dendrites.
  4. c) cell bodies; myelinated axons.
  5. d) synaptic clefts; neurotransmitters.

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 53

Textbook LO 2.8: What are the components of the cerebrum?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: Components of the Cerebrum

 

  1. The cerebral cortex contains three types of areas. These are the _____, _____, and _____ areas.
  2. a) sensory, motor, association
  3. b) cerebrum, cerebellum, callosum
  4. c) emotion, thinking, language
  5. d) organ, skin, muscle

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 53

Textbook LO 2.8: What are the components of the cerebrum?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: Components of the Cerebrum

 

  1. Memories, thought, perception and language are housed in the _____ area of the cerebrum.
  2. a) sensory
  3. b) limbic
  4. c) association
  5. d) dopaminergic

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 53

Textbook LO 2.8: What are the components of the cerebrum?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: Components of the Cerebrum

 

  1. The cerebral cortex of humans is so large it should not fit in our skull. The only reason it does is because of its _____
  2. a) shrinkage during gestation.
  3. b) convolutions.
  4. c) extension into the spinal cord.
  5. d) absence of fluid.

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 53

Textbook LO 2.8: What are the components of the cerebrum?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: Components of the Cerebrum

 

  1. Research suggests that the amount of _____ is associated with performance on intelligence tests.
  2. a) white matter
  3. b) brain volume
  4. c) glia
  5. d) gray matter

Answer: d

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 53

Textbook LO 2.8: What are the components of the cerebrum?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: Components of the Cerebrum

 

  1. The first functional division of the cerebral cortex is _____
  2. a) front, top, side and back.
  3. b) into lobes.
  4. c) left and right sides.
  5. d) cerebrum and limbic areas.

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 53

Textbook LO 2.8: What are the components of the cerebrum?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: Components of the Cerebrum

 

  1. The second functional division of the cerebral cortex involves _____
  2. a) frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes.
  3. b) sensory, motor and association areas.
  4. c) hindbrain, midbrain, forebrain.
  5. d) hypothalamus, pons, limbic system.

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 53

Textbook LO 2.8: What are the components of the cerebrum?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: Components of the Cerebrum

 

  1. Lateralization refers to which of the following?
  2. a) the idea that the right side of the brain controls the left side of the body
  3. b) the notion that each hemisphere of the brain specializes in particular functions
  4. c) the procedure in which the corpus callosum is severed
  5. d) the inability to produce speech

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 54

Textbook LO 2.9: What are the specialized functions of the left and right cerebral hemispheres?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Cerebral Hemispheres

 

  1. Which of the following statements is true regarding right and left hemisphere functioning?
  2. a) Scientific research supports the claim that right-brained people are more creative.
  3. b) Scientific research supports the claim that left-brained people are more logical.
  4. c) Each hemisphere does have some specialized functions but they work together.
  5. d) Scientific research suggests that there is no specialized function in either hemisphere.

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 5354

Textbook LO 2.9: What are the specialized functions of the left and right cerebral hemispheres?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Cerebral Hemispheres

 

  1. Research has shown us that handedness is determined by _____
  2. a) genes.
  3. b) learning.
  4. c) conditioning.
  5. d) genes and learning.

Answer: d

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 54

Textbook LO 2.9: What are the specialized functions of the left and right cerebral hemispheres?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Cerebral Hemispheres

 

  1. The trait of hand preference illustrates that _____
  2. a) genes are our destiny.
  3. b) learning outweighs genes.
  4. c) nature always wins.
  5. d) nature and nurture work together.

Answer: d The capacity of individuals to adapt to loss of a dominant hand shows the adaptability of the brain. Although nature does play an important role in handedness, it interacts in complex ways with nurture.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 54

Textbook LO 2.9: What are the specialized functions of the left and right cerebral hemispheres?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Cerebral Hemispheres

 

  1. The left hemisphere controls movement on the _____ side of the body and handles most _____ functions.
  2. a) left; motor
  3. b) right; language
  4. c) right; auditory
  5. d) left; visual-spatial

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Difficult

Page Ref: 54

Textbook LO 2.9: What are the specialized functions of the left and right cerebral hemispheres?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Cerebral Hemispheres

 

  1. The left hemisphere has regions devoted to _____
  2. a) processing emotional cues.
  3. b) visual-spatial processing.
  4. c) math and logic.
  5. d) creative uses of thought and language.

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 54

Textbook LO 2.9: What are the specialized functions of the left and right cerebral hemispheres?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Cerebral Hemispheres

 

  1. People with severe, uncontrollable epilepsy, who have frequent grand mal seizures, have been helped by an operation that _____
  2. a) severs the communication between hemispheres.
  3. b) removes excitatory neurons.
  4. c) severs the substantia nigra and basal ganglia.
  5. d) removes most of the right hemisphere.

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 56

Textbook LO 2.9: What are the specialized functions of the left and right cerebral hemispheres?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Cerebral Hemispheres

 

  1. If we briefly flashed the image of an orange to the right field of vision of an individual after split-brain surgery, they will most likely say they see _____
  2. a) nothing.
  3. b) an orange.
  4. c) something but be unable to name it.
  5. d) only something round.

Answer: b The image shown in the right field of vision will be sent to the left (verbal) hemisphere where it will readily be identified as an orange.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Difficult

Page Ref: 57

Textbook LO 2.9: What are the specialized functions of the left and right cerebral hemispheres?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Cerebral Hemispheres

 

  1. Lyta sustained damage to her left hemisphere. Which of these areas is she most likely to have difficulty with as a result of left hemisphere damage?
  2. a) language
  3. b) control of the left side of her body
  4. c) interpreting facial expressions
  5. d) perceiving visual-spatial relationships

Answer: a The left hemisphere handles most language functions.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 5455

Textbook LO 2.9: What are the specialized functions of the left and right cerebral hemispheres?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Cerebral Hemispheres

 

  1. Which of the following represents an example of how damage to right hemisphere language areas might affect your language functions?
  2. a) You might not understand the causal link between I fell down and My knee hurts.
  3. b) You might not be able to speak.
  4. c) You might not understand any language.
  5. d) You might not be able to read out loud.

Answer: a The right hemisphere processes causal links between statements such as these.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 5455

Textbook LO 2.9: What are the specialized functions of the left and right cerebral hemispheres?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Cerebral Hemispheres

 

  1. Much of what we know about left and right hemisphere specializations comes from the study of people who had split-brain surgery. This surgery _____
  2. a) splits the lobes of the brain apart.
  3. b) severs the corpus callosum between hemispheres.
  4. c) severs the nerves from the spinal cord to the right hemisphere.
  5. d) severs the substantia nigra between hemispheres.

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 52

Textbook LO 2.9: What are the specialized functions of the left and right cerebral hemispheres?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Cerebral Hemispheres

 

  1. Roger Sperry won a Nobel Prize in medicine in 1981 for work which revealed, among other things, that the _____
  2. a) left hemisphere cant recognize objects.
  3. b) right hemisphere cant recognize objects.
  4. c) left hemisphere can recognize, but not name, objects.
  5. d) right hemisphere can recognize, but not name, objects.

Answer: d Sperrys study of split-brain patients demonstrated that an object shown only to the left eyethus transmitted only to the right hemispherecan be recognized. However, because the image did not go to the left hemisphere, the object cant be named, and the patient will verbally deny seeing anything.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Difficult

Page Ref: 5556

Textbook LO 2.9: What are the specialized functions of the left and right cerebral hemispheres?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Cerebral Hemispheres

 

  1. The largest of the brains lobes, the _____ lobe, is where multiple cognitive functions are performed.
  2. a) temporal
  3. b) prefrontal
  4. c) frontal
  5. d) parietal

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 57

Textbook LO 2.10: Which functions are associated with each of the four lobes of the cerebral cortex?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Four Cerebral Lobes

 

  1. Known for executive processing, the _____ is part of the frontal lobe that coordinates many cognitive functions into a unified experience.
  2. a) hippocampus
  3. b) occipital cortex
  4. c) prefrontal cortex
  5. d) processing cortex

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 57

Textbook LO 2.10: Which functions are associated with each of the four lobes of the cerebral cortex?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Four Cerebral Lobes

 

  1. Phineas Gage is a famous example of someone who sustained damage to their prefrontal cortex and lost the ability to _____
  2. a) think.
  3. b) speak.
  4. c) control impulses.
  5. d) coordinate movement.

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 57

Textbook LO 2.10: Which functions are associated with each of the four lobes of the cerebral cortex?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Four Cerebral Lobes

 

  1. As the case of Phineas Gage illustrated, the prefrontal cortex contributes to _____ functioning in addition to cognitive functioning.
  2. a) personality
  3. b) motor
  4. c) visual
  5. d) auditory

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 57

Textbook LO 2.10: Which functions are associated with each of the four lobes of the cerebral cortex?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Four Cerebral Lobes

 

  1. Moving toward the back of the head, the last area of the frontal lobe contains the _____
  2. a) visual cortex
  3. b) sensory cortex
  4. c) motor cortex
  5. d) parietal lobe

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 57

Textbook LO 2.10: Which functions are associated with each of the four lobes of the cerebral cortex?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Four Cerebral Lobes

 

  1. Wilder Penfield, a neurosurgeon, developed a map of the _____ cortex by stimulating different areas in conscious patients undergoing neurosurgery.
  2. a) visual
  3. b) sensory
  4. c) motor
  5. d) parietal

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 57

Textbook LO 2.10: Which functions are associated with each of the four lobes of the cerebral cortex?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Four Cerebral Lobes

 

  1. Brocas area is involved in _____
  2. a) understanding words.
  3. b) choosing the correct words to use.
  4. c) the muscle movements required for speech.
  5. d) decision making.

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 59

Textbook LO 2.10: Which functions are associated with each of the four lobes of the cerebral cortex?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Four Cerebral Lobes

 

  1. Aphasia is a general term for loss or impairment of the ability to _____
  2. a) coordinate movement.
  3. b) use or understand language.
  4. c) recognize objects.
  5. d) control impulses.

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 59

Textbook LO 2.10: Which functions are associated with each of the four lobes of the cerebral cortex?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Four Cerebral Lobes

 

  1. Directly behind the frontal lobe is the _____ lobe, where sensory information registers in the _____ cortex.
  2. a) postfrontal; sensory
  3. b) preoccipital; visual
  4. c) temporal; auditory
  5. d) parietal; somatosensory

Answer: d

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 59

Textbook LO 2.10: Which functions are associated with each of the four lobes of the cerebral cortex?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Four Cerebral Lobes

 

  1. At the very back of the cerebrum, the _____ lobe contains the primary _____ cortex.
  2. a) occipital; visual
  3. b) parietal; sensory
  4. c) auditory; temporal
  5. d) limbic; emotional

Answer: a

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 59

Textbook LO 2.10: Which functions are associated with each of the four lobes of the cerebral cortex?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Four Cerebral Lobes

 

  1. Slightly above the ears, the _____ lobes contain the primary _____ cortex, which receives sound input from our ears.
  2. a) auditory; temporal
  3. b) temporal; auditory
  4. c) hearing; sound
  5. d) parietal; sensory

Answer: b

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 60

Textbook LO 2.10: Which functions are associated with each of the four lobes of the cerebral cortex?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Four Cerebral Lobes

 

  1. Speech sounds register first in the primary _____ cortex; they are then sent to _____ area where they are unscrambled into meaningful patterns of words.
  2. a) temporal; Brocas
  3. b) parietal; sensory
  4. c) auditory; Wernickes
  5. d) sensory; prefrontal

Answer: c

Skill Level: Factual

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 60

Textbook LO 2.10: Which functions are associated with each of the four lobes of the cerebral cortex?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Four Cerebral Lobes

 

  1. Visual processing is to the _____ lobes as auditory processing is to the _____ lobes.
  2. a) occipital; temporal
  3. b) parietal; occipital
  4. c) temporal; frontal
  5. d) temporal; parietal

Answer: a Visual processing is done by the primary visual cortex located in the occipital lobe, whereas auditory processing is done by the primary auditory cortex located in the temporal lobe.

Skill Level: Conceptual

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 5960

Textbook LO 2.10: Which functions are associated with each of the four lobes of the cerebral cortex?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Four Cerebral Lobes

 

  1. Marta was in an automobile accident and suffered an injury to her brain, resulting in paralysis of her left arm. What part of Martas brain was injured?
  2. a) auditory association area
  3. b) motor cortex
  4. c) association areas
  5. d) somatosensory cortex

Answer: c The motor cortex is responsible for sending motor commands to the muscles of the somatic nervous system.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Easy

Page Ref: 5758

Textbook LO 2.10: Which functions are associated with each of the four lobes of the cerebral cortex?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Four Cerebral Lobes

Item Analysis: % correct 82 a = 0 b = 82 c = 5 d = 11 r = .36

 

  1. Bill was admitted to the hospital last week after he fell. When Bills son visited, he found his father was unable to form words without great difficulty. If Bills difficulty speaking is due to brain damage, what is the likely location of the damage?
  2. a) Brocas area
  3. b) Galls area
  4. c) Wernickes area
  5. d) Korsakoffs area

Answer: a Brocas area is devoted to the muscle movements required to form speech.

Skill Level: Applied

Difficulty: Moderate

Page Ref: 5759

Textbook LO 2.10: Which functions are associated with each of the four lobes of the cerebral cortex?, APA LO 5.2a

Topic: The Four Cerebral Lobes

Item Analysis: % correct 75 a = 75 b = 2 c = 22 d = 2 r = .35

 

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