Psychology 10th Edition by Carole Wade -Test Bank

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Psychology 10th Edition by Carole Wade -Test Bank

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Psychology 10th Edition by Carole Wade -Test Bank

Name  __________________________________________________________

 

Chapter 2 Quick Quiz 1

 

 

  1. A(n) _______________ is an organized system of assumptions and principles that purports to explain a specified set of phenomena.
  2. theory                                                               c.     operational definition
  3. hypothesis                                                       d.     experiment

 

  1. An ideal scientist should:
  2. not express skepticism of new ideas.          c.     not support falsifiable theories.
  3. rely on scientific intuition.                            d.     be willing to make risky predictions.

 

  1. An advantage of naturalistic observation is that:
  2. it shows whether two or more variables are related.
  3. firm conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn.
  4. it is often useful in the first stages of a research program.
  5. it provides a large amount of information on large numbers of people.

 

  1. An advantage of correlation is that:
  2. it shows whether two or more variables are related.
  3. firm conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn.
  4. it is often useful in the first stages of a research program.
  5. it provides a large amount of information on large numbers of people.

 

  1. Which of the following methods would be most appropriate to study the effects of alcohol consumption on

problem-solving ability?

  1. correlation                                                       c.     case study
  2. experiments                                                     d.     naturalistic observation

 

  1. The variable manipulated by the researcher in an experiment is the:
  2. control variable.                                             c.     dependent variable.
  3. independent variable.                                    d.     experimental variable.

 

  1. The purpose of a double-blind study is:
  2. to eliminate experimenter effects.              c.     to test the effects of a placebo.
  3. to increase experimental effects.                d.     to determine the visual ability of newborn infants.

 

  1. Descriptive statistics:
  2. organize and summarize research data.
  3. allow determination of statistical significance.
  4. allow researchers to draw inferences about their results.
  5. show how likely it is that a studys results occurred merely by chance.

 

  1. Meta-analysis is used to:
  2. determine statistical significance.
  3. combine results from several studies.
  4. determine the probability of chance affecting the results.
  5. maintain ethical standards in research.

 

  1. APA ethical standards require researchers to:
  2. avoid double-blind studies.                          c.     limit the use of volunteers as subjects.
  3. avoid the use of deception.                          d.     obtain informed consent from subjects.

Chapter 2 Quick Quiz 1

Answer Key

 

 

 

  1. a Rationale:  This is the definition of a theory. (Page 35, Factual)

 

  1. d Rationale:  Scientists should be willing to make risky predictions.  All the

other choices are the opposite of ideal characteristics of scientists. (Pages 36,

Conceptual)

 

  1. c Rationale:  Naturalistic observation is important early in the research process to

generate hypotheses, but it does not test hypotheses. (Page 40, Conceptual)

 

  1. a Rationale:  Correlation is a technique used to measure the strength and

direction of a relationship between two or more variables. (Page 45, Conceptual)

 

  1. b Rationale:  Since this example is looking for a cause-and-effect relationship,

experiment is the only appropriate method. (Page 49, Applied)

 

  1. b Rationale:  This is the definition of an independent variable. (Page 50, Factual)

 

  1. a Rationale:  Double-blind studies are used to eliminate possible bias and

experimenter effects. (Page 52, Factual)

 

  1. a Rationale:  Descriptive statistics organize and summarize results, while

inferential statistics help to determine whether results are significant. (Page 55,

Factual)

 

  1. b Rationale:  Meta-analysis is a statistical technique for combining the results of

multiple studies. (Page 58, Factual)

 

  1. d Rationale:  APA ethical guidelines require the use of informed consent to

protect research subjects. (Page 60, Factual)

 

Name  __________________________________________________________

 

Chapter 2 Quick Quiz 2

 

  1. A(n) _______________ is a statement that attempts to predict or to account for a set of phenomena.
  2. theory c.     operational definition
  3. hypothesis d.     experiment

 

  1. An ideal scientist should:
  2. not express skepticism of new ideas.          c.     make sure theories are falsifiable.
  3. rely on scientific intuition.                            d.     not make risky predictions.

 

  1. An advantage of case studies is that:
  2. they can confirm hypotheses.
  3. general behavioral principles can be derived from them.
  4. they can help determine cause and effect.
  5. they provide in-depth information about unusual cases.

 

  1. Which of the following methods would be most appropriate to study maternal behavior in chimpanzees?
  2. correlation                                                       c.     case study
  3. experiments                                                     d.     naturalistic observation

 

  1. An advantage of an experiment is that:
  2. it shows whether two or more variables are related.
  3. firm conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn.
  4. it is often useful in the first stages of a research program.
  5. it provides a large amount of information on large numbers of people.

 

  1. An advantage of a survey is that:
  2. it shows whether two or more variables are related.
  3. firm conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn.
  4. it is often useful in the first stages of a research program.
  5. it provides a large amount of information on large numbers of people.

 

  1. In a double-blind experiment:
  2. neither the subjects in the experimental group nor the subjects in the control group know the experimental hypothesis.
  3. neither the subjects in the experimental group nor the subjects in the control group know which group they are in.
  4. neither the subjects nor the researcher know which subjects are in which group.
  5. neither the subjects in the experimental group nor the subjects in the control group know or can see the

experimenter.

 

  1. Statistical significance means that:
  2. results are meaningful.                                  c.     results are unlikely to be due to chance.
  3. results are important.                                     d.     results are typical.

 

  1. Cross-sectional studies allow one to determine the:
  2. statistical significance of results.                 c.     experimenter effects.
  3. effect size.                                                       d.     generational differences.

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT a reason psychologists study animals?
  2. to discover practical applications               c.     to avoid use of deception
  3. to improve human welfare                           d.     to clarify theoretical questions

Chapter 2 Quick Quiz 2

Answer Key

 

 

 

  1. b Rationale:  This is the definition of a hypothesis. (Page 35, Factual)

 

  1. c Rationale:  A scientist should make sure theories are falsifiable.  All the

other choices are the opposite of ideal characteristics of scientists. (Pages 35-36,

Conceptual)

 

  1. d Rationale:  Case studies provide in-depth information about an individual case

and generate hypotheses, but they cannot be used to confirm hypotheses or

determine cause and effect. (Page 39, Conceptual)

 

  1. d Rationale:  In this case, naturalistic observation would be most appropriate

because the researcher wants to know about the natural behaviors of chimpanzees.

(Page 40, Applied)

 

  1. b Rationale:  The primary advantage of an experiment is that it can be used to

determine cause and effect. (Page 49, Conceptual)

 

  1. d Rationale:  Surveys can provide a lot of information about attitudes, beliefs,

opinions, and behaviors of large groups of people. (Pages 43-44, Conceptual)

 

  1. c Rationale:  Double-blind experiments are conducted to eliminate experimenter

effects by keeping both the subjects and the researcher blind to which group a

particular subject is in. (Page 52, Factual)

 

  1. c Rationale:  Tests of statistical significance are used to determine the likelihood

that a particular set of results are due to chance factors. (Page 56, Factual)

 

  1. d Rationale:  Cross-sectional studies are useful in studying generational

differences, whereas longitudinal studies are more useful in studying changes in a

person over a period of time. (Page 58, Conceptual)

 

  1. c Rationale:  Psychologists should use caution in experiments with humans that

involve deception, but they do not need to avoid deception.  The other choices are

all reasons that psychologists study animals. (Page 61, Conceptual)

 

Multiple Choice Questions

 

INTRODUCTION

 

  1. Research methods are important for all of the following reasons EXCEPT:
  2. they allow researchers to separate reliable information from unfounded claims.
  3. they can help a person make a wiser decision between alternatives.
  4. they provide the means for false claims to be verified.
  5. they are the basic foundation for psychology and other sciences.

Section: Chapter Introduction

Page(s):  34                                                          Type: Conceptual                                               Answer: c

Rationale:  Research methods provide the means for false claims to be found out for what they are.  All other choices are accurate.

               

  1. When psychologists learned that hopeful parents of autistic children were being drawn to a program of facilitated communication:
  2. they carefully analyzed the testimonials about the therapy before accepting it.
  3. they conducted experiments involving autistic children and their facilitators.
  4. they conducted a survey of all the facilitators working with autistic children.
  5. they argued that it was not ethical to use this technique with children.

Section: Chapter Introduction

Page(s):  33                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: b

Rationale:  The research involving autistic children and their facilitators demonstrated that the claims concerning facilitated communication were false.

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT one of the reasons why research methods matter so much to psychologists?
  2. These methods allow psychologists to separate truth from unfounded belief.
  3. These methods allow psychologists to gain respect from the hard sciences.
  4. These methods allow psychologists to sort out conflicting views.
  5. These methods allow psychologists to correct false ideas that might cause people harm.

Section: Chapter Introduction

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Conceptual                                               Answer: b

Rationale:  While use of research methods may result in increased respect from the hard sciences, this is not the reason they are used.  They are used because psychology is a science and, as such, its data must be based on empirical evidence.

 

WHAT MAKES PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH SCIENTIFIC?

    Learning Objectives

    2.1  The characteristics of an ideal scientist

    2.2  The nature of a scientific theory

    2.3  The secret of a good scientific definition

    2.4  The risk scientists take when testing their ideas

    2.5  Why secrecy is a big no-no in science

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. When the authors refer to psychologists as scientists, they mean that:
  2. psychologists work with complicated computers and laboratory equipment.
  3. psychologists rely upon sophisticated brain-imaging machines.
  4. psychologists base their work on scientific attitudes and procedures.
  5. psychologists wear white coats when they conduct animal research.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Conceptual                                               Answer: c

Rationale:  As a science, psychologists trust only evidence based on empirical data resulting from the use of the scientific method.  Science is a way of asking and answering questions and has little to do with the equipment used or the clothing worn.

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT a key characteristic of scientists?
  2. precision
  3. skepticism
  4. openness
  5. humanism

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s): 35-36                                                     Type: Conceptual                                               Answer: d

Rationale:  Precision, skepticism, openness to new ideas, and reliance on empirical evidence are the hallmarks of a scientist.

 

  1. An organized system of assumptions and principles that purports to explain a specified set of phenomena and their interrelationships is called a/an:
  2. hypothesis.
  3. operational definition.
  4. double-blind study.
  5. theory.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: d

Rationale:  This is the definition of a theory.

% correct 83      a= 13  b= 0  c= 3  d= 83      r = .50

 

  1. A theory is:
  2. an opinion or idea about the causes of some phenomenon.
  3. an organized system of assumptions and principles that attempts to explain some phenomenon.
  4. a group of interrelated statements about cause and effect.
  5. a hunch about the causes of related phenomena.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: b

Rationale:  A theory is an organized system of assumptions and principles that attempts to explain some phenomenon.

 

  1. A statement that attempts to predict or to account for a set of phenomena is called a/an:
  2. hypothesis.
  3. operational definition.
  4. double-blind study.
  5. theory.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: a

Rationale:  A hypothesis is a prediction, usually derived from a theory.

% correct 100      a= 100  b= 0  c= 0  d= 0      r = .00

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following statements is NOT true?
  2. A hypothesis is a specific prediction derived from a theory.
  3. A hypothesis is a statement that attempts to explain a specific behavior.
  4. A hypothesis is a statement about a relationship between variables that may be empirically tested.
  5. A hypothesis is a prediction about future events based on guesswork.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Conceptual                                               Answer: d

Rationale:  Hypotheses are not based on guesswork, though they may be educated guesses based on empirical knowledge.

 

  1. A hypothesis is defined as:
  2. a statement that attempts to predict a set of phenomena, and specifies relationships among variables

that can be empirically tested.

  1. an organized system of assumptions and principles that purports to explain a specified set of

phenomena and their interrelationships.

  1. the precise meaning of a term which specifies the operations for observing and measuring the process

or phenomenon being investigated.

  1. the principle that a scientific theory must make predications that are specific enough to expose the

theory to the possibility of disconfirmation.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: a

Rationale:  A hypothesis is a prediction, usually derived from a theory. 

 

  1. Theory is defined as:
  2. a statement that attempts to predict a set of phenomena, and specifies relationships among variables that can be empirically tested.
  3. an organized system of assumptions and principles that purports to explain a specified set of phenomena and their interrelationships.
  4. the precise meaning of a term which specifies the operations for observing and measuring the process or phenomenon being investigated.
  5. the principle that a scientific theory must make predications that are specific enough to expose the theory to the possibility of disconfirmation.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: b

Rationale:  A theory is an organized system of assumptions and principles that attempts to explain some phenomenon.

 

  1. A scientific theory could be thought of as:
  2. a personal opinion.
  3. an established truth.
  4. an organized system of assumptions.
  5. a measure of strength between two variables.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Conceptual                                               Answer: c

Rationale:  A theory is not a personal opinion, an established truth, or a measure of strength.  It is an organized system of assumptions and principles that attempts to explain some phenomenon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. An operational definition is:
  2. a statement that attempts to predict a set of phenomena, and specifies relationships among variables that can be empirically tested.
  3. an organized system of assumptions and principles that purports to explain a specified set of phenomena and their interrelationships.
  4. the precise meaning of a term which specifies the operations for observing and measuring the process or phenomenon being investigated.
  5. the principle that a scientific theory must make predications that are specific enough to expose the theory to the possibility of disconfirmation.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: c

Rationale:  An operational definition states how a variable will be measured.

% correct 67      a= 7  b= 17  c= 67  d= 7      r = .22

 

  1. An operational definition:
  2. tells how something is to be observed and measured.
  3. tells the meaning of a term in scientific language.
  4. tells the meaning of a term in lay language.
  5. tells what is expected to result from manipulation of a variable.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: a

Rationale:  An operational definition states how a variable will be measured.

% correct 97      a= 97  b= 3  c= 0  d= 0      r = .47

 

  1. Which of the following is an operational definition of depression?
  2. a feeling of extreme sadness
  3. a sense of futility and hopelessness
  4. a score on the Beck Depression Inventory
  5. the opposite of euphoria

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Applied                                                     Answer: c

Rationale:  Only a score on the Beck Depression Inventory specifies how depression will be measured.

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT a possible operational definition of intelligence?
  2. a persons score on the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Test
  3. a persons ability to reason and solve problems
  4. a students cumulative GPA
  5. the length of time a person takes to solve a complex maze

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Applied                                                     Answer: b

Rationale:  An operational definition must specify how a variable is to be measured.

 

  1. The principle of falsifiability is defined as:
  2. a statement that attempts to predict a set of phenomena, and specifies relationships among variables that can be empirically tested.
  3. an organized system of assumptions and principles that purports to explain a specified set of phenomena and their interrelationships.
  4. the precise meaning of a term which specifies the principles for observing and measuring the process or phenomenon being investigated.
  5. the principle that a scientific theory must make predications that are specific enough to expose the theory to the possibility of disconfirmation.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  36                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: d

Rationale:  To be useful, a scientific theory must be specific enough that its predictions can be proved or disproved.

 

  1. A precise meaning of a term which species the operations for observing and measuring the process or phenomenon being investigated is called a/an:
  2. hypothesis.
  3. operational definition.
  4. double-blind study.
  5. theory.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: b

Rationale:  This is a definition of an operational definition.

 

  1. Marcy is trying to define anxiety in a way that can be empirically tested. She is attempting to find an appropriate:
  2. hypothesis.
  3. operational definition.
  4. double-blind study.
  5. theory.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Applied                                                     Answer: b

Rationale:  Operational definitions specify how variables are to be observed or measured.

 

  1. Hannah has always been drawn to the saying Absence makes the heart grow fonder, and she decides that this saying will be incorporated into her research project. Hannah is trying to define absence in a way that can be empirically tested.  She is attempting to find an appropriate:
  2. hypothesis.
  3. operational definition.
  4. double-blind study.
  5. theory.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Applied                                                     Answer: b

Rationale:  Operational definitions specify how variables are to be observed or measured.

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT one of the key characteristics of the ideal scientist?
  2. precision
  3. skepticism
  4. openness in regard to ideas and research
  5. avoidance of risky predictions

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35-37                                                    Type: Conceptual                                               Answer: d

Rationale:  Scientists are not afraid to make risky predictions.

 

  1. Which of the following statements is NOT true?
  2. It is important to balance skepticism with openness to new ideas.
  3. Skepticism in science is an unwillingness to accept an idea without empirical evidence.
  4. Even though skepticism about new ideas is important, a scientist should accept older ideas that have been endorsed by authorities in the field.
  5. Skepticism and caution go hand in hand.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Conceptual                                               Answer: c

Rationale:  All ideas, both new and old, should be subjected to the test of empirical support and should not be accepted just because they are endorsed by an authority.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following is most characteristic of scientists?
  2. creativity in developing new ideas to test
  3. reliance on empirical evidence
  4. intense conviction that a hypothesis is true
  5. reliance on scientific authority

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35-37                                                    Type: Conceptual                                               Answer: b

Rationale:  The basis of all science is reliance on empirical evidence.

 

  1. In order to be taken seriously, a hypothesis must be:
  2. plausible given the current theories.
  3. backed by empirical evidence.
  4. imaginative and appealing.
  5. suggested by a credible authority.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  35                                                          Type: Conceptual                                               Answer: b

Rationale:  Empirical evidence is the key to taking a theory or hypothesis seriously in science.

 

  1. According to the principle of falsifiability:
  2. a scientific theory must make predictions that are specific enough to expose the theory to the possibility of disconfirmation.
  3. false conclusions are reached in a scientific study when researchers make risky predictions.
  4. researchers must conduct naturalistic observations in order to reach a causal rationale about a particular behavior.
  5. hypotheses should be considered false until scientific research proves, without a doubt, that they are true.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  36                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: a

Rationale:  To be useful, a scientific theory must be specific enough that its predictions can be proved or disproved, that is, it is falsifiable.

 

  1. The principle of falsifiability means that:
  2. scientists must be careful not to falsify their results.
  3. scientists, as well as people in general, tend to accept false information when it is endorsed by an authority.
  4. a scientist must state an idea in such a way that it can be refuted or disproved by counterevidence.
  5. theories that have not been proven are considered falsified.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  36                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: c

Rationale:  To be useful, a scientific theory must be specific enough that its predictions can be proved or disproved, that is, it is falsifiable.

 

  1. Confirmation bias is:
  2. a tendency to look for evidence that supports our theory and ignore evidence that contradicts it.
  3. a tendency to believe theories that have been confirmed by empirical data.
  4. a tendency to accept replicated studies but not accept studies that have not been replicated.
  5. a belief that bias exists in many studies that prevents them from being confirmed.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  36                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: a

Rationale:  Confirmation bias is a tendency to look for evidence that supports our theory and ignore evidence that contradicts it.

 

 

 

 

 

  1. The tendency to look for information that supports ones own belief is called the:
  2. principle of falsifiability.
  3. confirmation bias.
  4. criterion validity.
  5. volunteer bias.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  36                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: b

Rationale:  This is a definition of confirmation bias.

 

  1. In the 1990s, some police officers argued that murderous satanic cults were widespread, but the FBI was never able to substantiate this claim. The police officers continued to believe in the existence of the cults, saying that the FBI was part of the conspiracy. Our textbook points out that this is a violation of _______________ in everyday life.
  2. the coefficient of correlation
  3. the volunteer bias
  4. the principle of falsifiability
  5. replication

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  36                                                          Type: Conceptual                                               Answer: c

Rationale:  The belief of the police officers in satanic cults could not be disproved, therefore it was not a valid theory.

 

  1. Which of the following statements is true?
  2. Scientists should keep their research secret so others will not steal their ideas.
  3. It is a waste of time and money to replicate a study that has already been done.
  4. Disclosure of the details of a study is important to allow for replication by others.
  5. Research procedures, once patented, should be shared openly.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  36-37                                                    Type: Conceptual                                               Answer: c

Rationale:  Science depends on the free flow of ideas and full disclosure of studies.  Replication is an essential part of the scientific process.

 

  1. Scientists are expected to submit their results to professional journals, which send the findings to experts for evaluation before publication. This process is called:
  2. reliability.
  3. criterion validity.
  4. peer review.
  5. content validity.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s): 37                                                           Type: Factual                                                      Answer: c

Rationale:  This is a definition of the peer review process.

 

  1. One purpose of peer review is to:
  2. make sure that the researchers did not deceive their subjects in any way.
  3. choose which, among competing interpretations of a finding, is best.
  4. scrutinize the evidence before any announcement to the public.
  5. make sure that the research does not involve animals as subjects.

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  37                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: c

Rationale:  A major purpose of peer review is to make sure a study used valid methods in obtaining its results.  Otherwise the results are not valid and could be misleading.

 

 

 

 

 

  1. What was wrong with Norman Cousinss claim that humor and vitamins could cure life-threatening diseases?
  2. it was not falsifiable
  3. it was not based on empirical evidence
  4. its variables were not operationally defined
  5. it resulted from confirmation bias

Section: What Makes Psychological Research Scientific?

Page(s):  37                                                          Type: Conceptual                                               Answer: b

Rationale:  Norman Cousinss claim was based on only one case, his own, and was therefore anecdotal evidence that had not been empirically tested.

 

 

DESCRIPTIVE STUDIES: ESTABLISHING THE FACTS

    Learning Objectives

    2.6  How participants are selected for psychological studies, and why it matters

    2.7  The methods psychologists use to describe behavior

    2.8  The advantages and disadvantages of using descriptive research methods

 

 

  1. Researchers prefer to select participants that accurately represent the larger population that the researcher is interested in.  This type of group is called a(n):
  2. experimental sample
  3. single-blind sample
  4. significance tests
  5. representative sample

Section: Descriptive Studies: Establishing the Facts

Page(s):  38                                                          Type: Factual                                                      Answer: d

Rationale:  This is a definition of a representative sample.

 

  1. Which of the following would be considered a good example of a representative sample of college students in the United States:
  2. a survey given to several rural classrooms in your state
  3. a questionnaire mailed to several zip codes
  4. a survey given to a diverse population in both urban and rural classrooms in several

states

  1. volunteers who found your survey on the internet

Section: Descriptive Studies: Establishing the Facts

Page(s):  38                                                          Type: Applied                                                     Answer: c

Rationale:  A representative sample should reflect the larger population that the researcher is interested in.

 

  1. Research methods that depict behavior, but are not necessarily causal explanations are called:
  2. experimental methods.
  3. single-blind studies.
  4. significance tests.
  5. descriptive methods.

Section: Descriptive Studies: Establishing the Facts

Page(s):  39       &nb

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