Sensation And Perception 9th Ed.By Goldstein Test Bank

<< Social Psychology 4th edition by Dacher Keltner -Test Bank Solution Manual For Probability And Stochastic Processes A Friendly Introduction For Electrical And Computer Engineers 3rd Edition By Roy D. Yates >>
Product Code: 222
Availability: In Stock
Price: $24.99
Qty:     - OR -   Add to Wish List
Add to Compare

Sensation And Perception 9th Ed.By Goldstein Test Bank

Description

WITH ANSWERS

Sensation And Perception 9th Ed.By Goldstein Test Bank

Test BankChapter 2: The Beginnings of Perception

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Our perception of the environment depends on
a. the properties of the objects in the environment.
b. the properties of the electrical signals in the nervous system.
c. both the properties of the environmental objects and properties of the electrical signals in the nervous system.
d. none of these are true.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Starting at the Beginning                 MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Visible light is between _____ and ____ nm within the electromagnetic spectrum.
a. 100; 400 c. 500; 1000
b. 400; 700 d. 900; 1500

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Light: Stimulus for Vision              MSC:  Factual

 

  1. A wavelength of 100 nm would fall in the ______ range of the electromagnetic spectrum.
a. X-rays c. infrared rays
b. ultraviolet rays d. gamma rays

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Figure: Electromagnetic Spectrum  MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Light can be described in terms of wavelength, or as consisting of small packets of energy called
a. photons. c. ions.
b. electrons. d. pulsars.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Light: Stimulus for Vision              MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The structure of the eye that provides about 80% of the eyes focusing power is the
a. iris. c. cornea.
b. pupil. d. lens.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Light Focused by the Eye               MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Jan tries to focus on the tip of her pencil as she brings it closer to her. She feels the strain on her eye as she does this. What she is feeling in her eye is due to the process called
a. inhibition. c. accommodation.
b. reflection. d. assimilation.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Demonstration: What is in Focus    MSC:  Applied

 

  1. The distance at which the lens can no longer bring a close object into focus is called the
a. far point. c. high point.
b. near point. d. coupee point.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Light Focused by the Eye               MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Loreleis mother is 60 years old. Because of the condition called ______, the closest distance at which she can focus an object is probably about ____ cm.
a. cataracts; 20 c. presbyopia; 100
b. cataracts; 40 d. dermabrasion; 150

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Loss of Accommodation with Age MSC:  Applied

 

  1. LASIK surgery is used to treat _______ by cutting a small flap in the _________.
a. myopia; cornea c. hyperopia; cornea
b. myopia; lens d. presbyopia; lens

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Myopia          MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Individual suffering from myopia may have difficulty seeing _______ objects clearly. Often times they are also referred to as being _______.
a. nearby; farsighted c. distant; farsighted
b. nearby; nearsighted d. distant; nearsighted

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Myopia          MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Vera has hyperopia, and tends to get headaches when she reads. This is because
a. Vera also has presbyopia and has the constant need to accommodate. c. Vera has just had LASIK surgery and her ciliary muscles are damaged.
b. Vera also has myopia and is unable to accommodate. d. Vera is 5-years-old and lacks the visual acuity to read.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Hyperopia      MSC:  Applied

 

  1. The visual pigment molecules are contained in the
a. inner segments of the visual receptors. c. axons of the rods.
b. outer segments of the visual receptors. d. axons of the cones.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Transforming Light to Electrical Energy

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. _______ reacts to light to start the process of transduction.
a. Opsin c. Choroid
b. Retinal d. Thyric acid

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Transforming Light to Electrical Energy

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The isomerization of a single pigment molecule triggers what is best described as a
a. chain reaction. c. hyperactive potential.
b. ballistic expansion. d. hypopolarization wave.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Transforming Light to Electrical Energy

MSC:  Factual

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following is true about the difference between the rods and the cones?
a. The rods control vision in high illumination conditions, and the cones control vision in low illumination conditions.
b. The rods are packed in an area called the fovea, and the cones are found more in the peripheral retina.
c. There are about 120 million rods in the human eye and about 5 million cones.
d. The only difference between the rods and the cones is physical shape.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Distribution of Rods and Cones     MSC:  Factual

 

  1. A retinal condition that destroys the cones in the fovea is
a. macular degeneration. c. presbyopia.
b. retinitis pigmentosa. d. retinal hypopolarization.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Distribution of Rods and Cones     MSC:  Factual

 

  1. In the early stages of _______, peripheral rod receptors are destroyed leading to poorer peripheral vision.
a. macular degeneration c. presbyopia
b. retinitis pigmentosa d. retinal hypopolarization

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Distribution of Rods and Cones     MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The blind spot is located
a. in the fovea. c. where the optic nerve leaves the eye.
b. in the vitreous. d. at the optic chiasm.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Distribution of Rods and Cones     MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Nina does a demonstration of seeing the blind spot, in which a grid pattern surrounds the black dot that disappears when it falls on the blind spot. What does Nina most likely see in the area where the dot disappears?
a. a blurry gray area c. nothing
b. a white circle d. a continuation of the grid pattern

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Filling in the Blind Spot                  MSC:  Applied

 

  1. The episode of Mythbusters cited in the textbook demonstrated that dark adaptation was the reason why
a. poker players wear sunglasses. c. cardinals have good night vision.
b. pirates wore eyepatches. d. giants have poor night vision.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Measuring the Dark Adaptation Curve

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. To isolate the rod portion of the dark adaptation curve, researchers
a. use rod monochromats as the participants.
b. present the stimulus foveally.
c. present the stimulus in the periphery.
d. use cone monochromats as participants.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Measuring Rod Adaptation             MSC:  Conceptual

  1. The rod-cone break in the dark adaptation curve occurs after about ___ in the dark.
a. 30 seconds c. 7 minutes
b. 2 minutes d. 30 minutes

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Measuring Rod Adaptation             MSC:  Factual

 

  1. When visual pigments become bleached they are
a. dead. c. color sensitive.
b. fully regenerated. d. detached from the opsim.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Visual Pigment Regeneration          MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Rushton demonstrated that the physiological mechanism behind dark adaptation is
a. visual pigment regeneration. c. modular organization.
b. the enzyme cascade. d. photon remission.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Visual Pigment Regeneration          MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Cone spectral sensitivity is measured by having the observer
a. look up and blink. c. look directly into a light.
b. look straight forward without blinking. d. look to the side of a flashing light.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Measuring the Spectral Sensitivity Curve

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. The peak in the spectral sensitivity curve is about _____ for the rods, and about _____ for the cones.
a. 700 nm; 400 nm c. 500 nm; 560 nm
b. 450 nm; 800 nm d. 600 nm; 450 nm

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Spectral Sensitivity Curve               MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The Purkinje shift
a. is when reds appear brighter than blues in well-lit conditions, but blues appear brighter than reds in dim conditions.
b. is when blues appear brighter than reds in well-lit conditions, but blues appear brighter than reds in dim conditions.
c. is when details that are easily seen in well-lit conditions become more difficult to see in low-light conditions.
d. demonstrates the importance of eye movements in visual pigment regeneration.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Spectral Sensitivity Curve               MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. There are ____different cone receptors, each with different absorption spectra.
a. 2 c. 4
b. 3 d. 7

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Rod and Cone Absorption Spectra MSC:  Factual

 

 

 

 

  1. The three major parts of a neuron are
a. dendrites, cell body, and axon. c. receptor, transmitter, and median.
b. axon, nerve fiber, and receptor. d. receptor, dendrites, and conductor.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Electrical Signals in Neurons          MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The difference in charge between the inside and the outside of the nerve fiber when the nerve is at rest is _____ mV.
a. 70 c. 0
b. 10 d. +19

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Recording Electrical Signals in Neurons

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Which of the following statements best defines the propagated response?
a. Once a response is triggered, the response travels the length of the axon without decreasing in amplitude.
b. Once a response is triggered, the response gradually increases in amplitude as it travels down the length of the axon.
c. The response increases the positive charge of the chlorine ions throughout the length of the axon.
d. The number of negative potassium ions increase the closer the impulse is to the dendrites.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Basic Properties of Action Potentials

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. As stimulus intensity is increased, recording from a single neuron shows
a. the amplitude of the action potential increases.
b. the amplitude of the action potential decreases.
c. the amplitude of the action potential may increase or decrease, depending on the stimulus.
d. the rate of firing of the nerve fiber increases.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Basic Properties of Action Potentials

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The upper limit of a neurons firing rate is estimated to be ____ impulses per second.
a. 20 c. 800
b. 100 d. 4400

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Basic Properties of Action Potentials

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. At the beginning of the action potential, _____ ions flow from outside the nerve fiber into the nerve fiber.
a. positive potassium c. positive sodium
b. negative potassium d. negative sodium

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Chemical Basis of Action Potentials

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The flow of ions that create the action potential are caused by the changes in the ______ of the nerve fiber.
a. suppression c. accommodation
b. permeability d. assimilation

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Chemical Basis of Action Potentials

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Synaptic vesicles contain chemicals called _________ that are released across the synapse to the next neuron.
a. electrolytyes c. neurotransmitters
b. collagens d. glial cells

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Transmitting Information Across a Gap

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The _____ analogy is used to describe the relationship of neurotransmitters with receptor sites.
a. needle in a haystack c. stadium wave
b. lock and key d. rolling stone

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Transmitting Information Across a Gap

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. ____________ is the process by which inhibitory transmitters cause the inside of the neuron to become more negative.
a. Hyperpolarization c. Antipolarization
b. Depolarization d. Repolarization

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Transmitting Information Across a Gap

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The rate of firing of the postsynaptic neuron depends on the amount of ______ input it receives from the presynaptic neuron.
a. excitation c. equalizing
b. inhibition d. both excitation and inhibition

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Transmitting Information Across a Gap

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. __________ is necessary for the neural transmission and processing of information.
a. Inhibition c. Exhibition
b. Excitation d. Both inhibition and excitation

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Transmitting Information Across a Gap

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Rods and cones synapse with ______ cells, which then synapse with ____ cells.
a. ganglion; bipolar c. amacrine; unipolar
b. bipolar; ganglion d. amacrine; bipolar

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Neural Convergence and Perception

MSC:  Factual

  1. Converging circuits with excitation and inhibition are associated most closely with which step of the perceptual process?
a. recognition c. neural processing
b. attention d. the environmental stimulus

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Neural Convergence and Perception

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. If we compare how the rods and cones converge onto other retinal neurons, we find that
a. foveal cones converge more than the peripheral rods.
b. rods and cones converge equally.
c. rods converge more than foveal cones.
d. horizontal cells converge onto the peripheral cones.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Neural Convergence and Perception

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Convergence results in _________ sensitivity and _______ acuity.
a. increased; increased c. decreased; decreased
b. increased; decreased d. decreased; increased

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Neural Convergence and Perception

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Reading the eye chart in an optometrists office is used to measure
a. acuity. c. receptive fields.
b. sensitivity. d. creativity.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Lack of Convergence Causes Better Acuity

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Acuity is better in the ____ than in the _____.
a. periphery; fovea c. optic disk; cornea
b. optic disk; fovea d. fovea; periphery

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Lack of Convergence Causes Better Acuity

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The difficulty of reading under dim light conditions can be explained by
a. the increased sensitivity of cones under low light conditions.
b. the increased acuity of cones under low light conditions.
c. the fact that rod functioning predominates during dark adaptation, therefore poor acuity.
d. the fact that cone functioning predominates during dark adaptation, therefore poor acuity.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Lack of Convergence Causes Better Acuity

MSC:  Conceptual

 

 

 

 

  1. The stimuli used in the preferential looking technique of testing infant acuity are
a. geons. c. Greebles.
b. gratings. d. faces.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Infant Visual Acuity                       MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Acuity develops to almost 20/20 vision by the time the infant is
a. one month old. c. one year old.
b. two months old. d. two years old.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Infant Visual Acuity                       MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Which of the following is a reason for the poor acuity of newborns?
a. The rods are not developed at birth.
b. Newborns have too much visual pigment in the cones.
c. A newborns rods have very narrow inner segments.
d. The visual cortex of the newborn is only partially developed.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Infant Visual Acuity                       MSC:  Factual

 

ESSAY

 

  1. Name, define, and discuss the treatment for three kinds of focusing problems.

 

ANS:  Answer not provided.

 

  1. (a) Discuss the major differences between the rods and the cones.

(b) Describe two retinal disorders that differentially affect the rods and the cones.

 

ANS:  Answer not provided.

 

  1. (a) What is the blind spot?

(b) Discuss two reasons why we are not usually aware of the blind spot.

 

ANS:  Answer not provided.

 

  1. (a) Draw a graph (with appropriate axis labels) of the dark adaptation curve.

(b) Describe the methodology used to isolate the rod component of the curve, and the cone component.

(c) Discuss how Rushton demonstrated the physiological basis to dark adaptation.

 

ANS:  Answer not provided.

 

  1. (a) What are the basic properties of action potentials?

(b) How do these properties relate to perception?

 

ANS:  Answer not provided.

 

 

  1. Describe the process of synaptic transmission. Include in this description the differences between excitatory and inhibitory transmitters.

 

ANS:  Answer not provided.

 

  1. Using words and/or diagrams, circuits with (a) no convergence; (b) convergence; and (c) convergence with inhibition affect neural firing rate.

 

ANS:  Answer not provided.

 

  1. (a) In words and/or diagrams, discuss why convergence of the rods results in increased sensitivity, but decreased acuity.

(b) In words and/or diagrams, discuss why the lack of convergence in the foveal cones results in decreased sensitivity, but increased acuity.

 

ANS:  Answer not provided.

 

  1. Describe how preferential looking and visual evoked potentials technique have been used to study infant perception.

 

ANS:  Answer not provided.

 

 

Test BankChapter 14: The Cutaneous Senses

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. The somatosensory system
a. is the same as the cutaneous sensory system.
b. is comprised of cutaneous sensations, proprioception, and kinesthesis.
c. is not activated when reading Braille.
d. is not important for motivating sexual activity.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Cutaneous Senses                           MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The function of the skin is
a. warning the individual of possible injury.
b. preventing body fluids form escaping.
c. protecting the organism from bacteria and chemical agents.
d. all of these are functions of the skin

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Skin               MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The _______ are located near the border of the epidermis and surface of the skin, and are associated with sensing fine details.
a. Pacinian corpuscle
b. Meissner corpuscles
c. Ruffini cylinders
d. Merkel receptors

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Mechanoreceptors                          MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT a mechanoreceptor?
a. Pacinian corpuscle c. Merkel receptors
b. Ruffini cylinders d. Chancellor cells

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Mechanoreceptors                          MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The ___________ are responsible for the perception of rapid vibrations, such as you would experience when using a hand-held massager.
a. Pacinian corpuscle
b. Meissner corpuscles
c. Ruffini cylinders
d. Merkel receptors

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Mechanoreceptors                          MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. The Meissner corpuscle is associated with
a. sensing vibrations. c. controlling handgrip.
b. sensing fine texture. d. sensing fine details.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Mechanoreceptors                          MSC:  Factual

 

 

  1. The nerve fibers in the spinal cord go in
a. the medial lemniscal pathway only.
b. the spinothalamic pathway only.
c. the geniculostriate pathway only.
d. both the medial lemniscal pathway and the spinothalamic pathway.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Pathways From Skin to Cortex       MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Ian Waterman was able to sense pain and temperature because his _______ pathway was intact, but could not feel touch and limb position because of damage to his ____ pathway.
a. lemniscal; spinothalamic c. homuncular; lemniscal
b. spinothalamic; lemniscal d. spinothermal; spinothalamic

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Pathways From Skin to Cortex       MSC:  Applied

 

  1. The fibers from the medial lemniscal pathway and the spinothalamic pathway go to the
a. lateral geniculate nucleus. c. ventrolateral nucleus.
b. medial geniculate nucleus. d. hypothalamus.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Pathways From Skin to Cortex       MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Penfield mapped locations of body parts on area S1 by
a. using fMRIs in humans.
b. lesioning S1 areas in the monkey.
c. using somatosensory-evoked potentials in monkeys.
d. stimulating S1 areas in humans, and asking where they felt body sensations.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Somatosensory Cortex                    MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The mapping of the body on the somatosensory cortex can be represented as the
a. homunculus. c. epidermis.
b. anosmia. d. pachyderm.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Somatosensory Cortex                    MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. The area on S1 associated with the thumb is as large as the area for the forearm. This is an example of
a. sensory substitution. c. cortical magnification.
b. Braille projection. d. the analgesic inversion principle.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Somatosensory Cortex                    MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Which of the following is true regarding body mapping in the somatosensory cortex?
a. Body maps only appear in S1.
b. Body map regions are proportionate to the actual size of the body parts.
c. Body maps appear in both the frontal and parietal lobes.
d. Body maps appear in S1 and S2.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Somatosensory Cortex                    MSC:  Conceptual

 

 

 

  1. Experience-dependent plasticity has been found to occur for
a. the somatosensory system only.
b. the auditory system only.
c. only the auditory and  somatosensory systems
d. the somatosensory, auditory, and visual systems.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Plasticity of Cortical Body Maps    MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Jan is a right-handed violin player she bows with her right hand and fingers the strings with her left. The cortical representation for the fingers on her left hand is
a. equal to the area for the fingers on her right hand.
b. equal to the area for the fingers on the left hand of a non-musician.
c. larger than the area for the fingers on the left hand of a non-musician.
d. smaller than the area for the fingers on the left hand of a non-musician.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Plasticity of Cortical Body Maps    MSC:  Applied

 

  1. Which of the following stimuli have been used to test tactile acuity?
a. Gratings
b. Letters
c. Two-point stimuli
d. Letters, gratings, and two-point stimuli have all been used.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Method: Measuring Tactile Acuity

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Which of the following body parts has the lowest two-point threshold?
a. Fingertips c. Forehead
b. Palms d. Upper arm

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Receptor Mechanisms for Tactile Acuity

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The density of the ______ on the fingertips than on the palms.
a. Merkel receptors is higher c. Merkel receptors is lower
b. Krausse end bulbs is higher d. Pacinian corpuscles is lower

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Receptor Mechanisms for Tactile Acuity

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. The receptive fields of cortical S1 neurons are
a. larger for the fingers than for the forearm.
b. larger for the fingers than for the hand.
c. smaller for the fingers than the forearm.
d. the same size for the fingers as for the hand.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Cortical Mechanisms for Tactile Acuity

MSC:  Conceptual

 

 

 

 

  1. The mechanoreceptors primarily responsible for feeling the vibrations from an electric toothbrush are _________ because these receptors contain an onion-like series of layers.
a. Pacinian corpuscles c. Ruffini cylinders
b. Merkel receptors d. Meissner corpuscles

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Perceiving Vibration                       MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Moving your finger across a textured surface can produce vibrations that are interpreted as texture. These vibrations are defined as
a. parietal cues. c. spatial cues.
b. temporal cues. d. olfactory cues.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Perceiving Texture                          MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. The duplex theory of texture perception refers to the importance of
a. temporal cues and spatial cues. c. spatial cues and auditory cues.
b. temporal cues and olfactory cues. d. temporal cues and parietal cues.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Perceiving Texture                          MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. The demonstration in which you perceived the texture of a surface using your pen or another tool showed
a. it is difficult to determine texture without directly touching the surface.
b. passive touch is more important than active touch in texture perception.
c. texture gradients are more important for vision than cutaneous senses.
d. that you can use vibrations to perceive the texture of the surface.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Demonstration: Perceiving Texture with a Pen

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. In most of our daily experience of touch, we are using
a. passive touch. c. two-point touch.
b. active touch. d. two-hand touch.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Perceiving Objects                          MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. When you try to identify a three-dimensional object by touch alone, and are allowed to have control over your hand and finger movements, you are using
a. passive touch. c. azimuth perception.
b. haptic perception. d. magnification touch.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   Perceiving Objects                          MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Which if the following is an exploratory procedure identified by Lederman and Klatzky?
a. Enclosure c. Contour following
b. Pressure d. All of these are EPs.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Identifying Objects by Haptic Exploration

MSC:  Factual

 

 

  1. BobbyDale is asked to use haptic perception to identify a soccer ball. She will most likely use the exploratory procedure(s) of _______________ to identify the soccer balls exact shape.
a. lateral motion and pressure c. enclosure and contour following
b. pressure only d. passive motion and lateral motion

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   Identifying Objects by Haptic Exploration

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. Mika touches a high-curvature stimulus and a lower-curvature stimulus with her fingertip. Which of the following best describes the firing of the mechanoreceptor fibers?
a. The receptors right at the point of contact respond the most and the ones further away fire less for the high-curvature stimulus, but there is no difference in firing for the lower-curvature stimulus.
b. The receptors right at the point of contact respond the most and the ones further away fire less for the lower-curvature stimulus, but there is no difference in firing for the high-curvature stimulus.
c. The receptors right at the point of contact respond the most and the ones further away fire less in both cases, and the pattern of firing is the same in both cases.
d. The receptors right at the point of contact respond the most and the ones further away fire less in both cases, but the pattern of firing is different for the two stimuli.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Physiology of Tactile Object Perception

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Neurons in the ventral posterior nucleus in the thalamus have
a. center-surround receptive fields c. no receptive fields.
b. ill-defined receptive fields. d. grating-like receptive fields.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   Physiology of Tactile Object Perception

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Neurons in the monkey somatosensory cortex have been found that
a. respond only to stimuli of a specific orientation.
b. respond only to active touching of a ruler.
c. respond differently under different attention conditions.
d. All of these have been found.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Physiology of Tactile Object Perception

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Neuropathic pain : __________ :: Inflammatory pain: _______.
a. tumor cells; phantom limb syndrome
b. tumor cells; carpal tunnel syndrome
c. carpal tunnel syndrome; azimuth burn
d. carpal tunnel syndrome; tumor cells

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   Pain               MSC: 

Write a review

Your Name:


Your Review: Note: HTML is not translated!

Rating: Bad           Good

Enter the code in the box below:



 

Once the order is placed, the order will be delivered to your email less than 24 hours, mostly within 4 hours. 

If you have questions, you can contact us here