Test Bank For Globalization- Prospects and Problems 1st Edition by JoAnn A. Chirico

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Test Bank For Globalization- Prospects and Problems 1st Edition by JoAnn A. Chirico

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WITH ANSWERS

Globalization Prospects and Problems 1st Edition by JoAnn A. Chirico
Test Bank

 

Multiple Choice

  1. According to Beck, the non-democratic effects of globalization include
  2. More countries are becoming autocracies than democracies
  3. Many decisions that affect peoples lives are never voted on
  4. People refusing to vote in countries where they have the opportunity
  5. Wars that plague many nations

B

 

  1. To be reflexive about modernity, according to Beck, means to be more
  2. questioning of our ideas of progress
  3. contemplative about the meaning of life
  4. accepting of rationality
  5. accepting of what science has to offer

A

 

  1. The second rationalization means
  2. to pursue science more vigorously
  3. to be skeptical about science and pursuit of progress
  4. to use rationality as our only guide
  5. that science can solve all of our problems

B

 

  1. The key to cosmopolitanism, according to Beck, is recognizing
  2. that city life offers the best opportunities
  3. that there is a global public with common interests
  4. that sophisticated tastes in art and music set one above the crowd
  5. local cultures are outdated

B

 

  1. In Becks version of cosmopolitanism, local cultures
  2. have no role
  3. are relegated to second class
  4. make important contributions to global culture
  5. limit peoples global vision

C

 

  1. Anthony Giddens conception of runaway world means that
  2. globalization is proceeding in a haphazard fashion
  3. the institutions of the globe are increasingly interconnected
  4. peoples needs can be met through national institutions
  5. the world is increasingly complex

A

 

  1. In Giddens view of the world
  2. only the elite have control over their lives
  3. the world is so complex and changing so quickly that no one has control
  4. the hazards posed by nature outweigh the hazards created by humankind
  5. only national economic policies can be effective in managing national economies

B

 

 

  1. The risks that face us in the contemporary world, according to Giddens,
  2. are fundamentally unknowable and thus incalculable
  3. are manufactured by humankind
  4. so far escape the capacity of national and international institutions to deal with them
  5. all of the above

D

 

  1. According to Kellner, the spread of technology has helped to spread
  2. global capitalism
  3. global socialism
  4. global communism
  5. all of the above

A

 

  1. One of the contradictions among political, economic and cultural factors in the modern world, according to Kellner is
  2. people recognize that their democratic rights are stifled by global capitalism
  3. terrorist acts force governments to act more democratically
  4. globalization does nothing to circulate democratic values
  5. all of the above

A

 

  1. Deeper economic integration is unlikely, according to Rodrik, because
  2. societies have successfully resisted global capitalism
  3. economic institutions within societies are linked to other institutions and this limits their capacity to change
  4. politicians change policies to beat the competition from other societies
  5. domestic policies will always win over foreign policies

B

 

  1. Rodrik used the concept of a golden straightjacket to illustrate how
  2. countries limit their options by creating policies they think will attract the most business
  3. countries fail to fulfill their debt obligations
  4. democracy can be enhanced as countries pursue foreign investment
  5. governments can pursue austerity measures despite peoples protests

A

 

  1. World systems theory maintains that
  2. economic relations determine others
  3. a societys values are paramount in its political system
  4. states do not play an important role in the global system
  5. the dominant feature of the global system is global socialism

A

 

  1. According to World Systems theorists, the world system is driven by
  2. conflict among stronger and weaker nations
  3. cooperative economics
  4. democratic relations among countries through international groups
  5. international agencies and organizations

A

 

  1. In world systems theory, the weakest societies are referred to as the
  2. Core
  3. Periphery
  4. Semi-periphery
  5. Marginal

B

 

  1. Peripheral societies supply
  2. Raw materials and low level processing
  3. High level services and high level manufacturing
  4. Mid-level manufacturing and some services
  5. The highest level on the value chain

A

 

  1. Maintaining hegemonic dominance can be unstable because it is
  2. Unfair
  3. Expensive
  4. Unchallenged
  5. Exploitative

B

 

  1. Wallerstein claims that the current world economic system may be near its end because of
  2. Diminishing profits from the capitalist enterprise
  3. Challenges from the semi-periphery
  4. Internal and external forces of alienation
  5. Each of the above is a possibility

D

 

  1. Profit, in a capitalist system, comes from
  2. reducing the costs of production
  3. Increasing price and sales
  4. Weak environmental laws
  5. All of the above

D

 

  1. Capitalism, according to World Systems Theory, is becoming less attractive as
  2. Wage laws are forcing higher wages
  3. Environmental and tax laws are becoming less favorable
  4. Countries and indigenous groups are claiming control over their resources
  5. All of the above

D

 

  1. Global systems theory differs from World systems theory
  2. States are the dominant actors
  3. States are only one set of actors among many
  4. The economic system is made up of states
  5. Systems extend across states

B

 

  1. Global systems theory and world systems theory are alike in that they both
  2. Put cultural production ahead of economic
  3. Emphasize global capitalism
  4. Say that globalization started hundreds of years ago
  5. Locate the source of power in a global hegemon

B

 

  1. The dominant force in the global system according to Global Systems theorists, is
  2. The transnational capitalist class
  3. The dominant core nations
  4. The United Nations
  5. The World Economic Forum

A

 

  1. According to Global Systems theory, mass media were essential in spreading _____ around the world.
  2. production
  3. the division of labor
  4. democratic values
  5. consumerist culture

D

 

  1. Each of us is linked to the global system
  2. as consumers
  3. by media
  4. in our transnational class
  5. all of the above

D

 

  1. Global systems theory predicts that major threats to the capitalist global system are
  2. advancing human rights ideology
  3. polarization of economic classes
  4. environmental unsustainability
  5. all of the above

D

 

  1. World society theory focuses on the development of a global society
  2. that exists apart from states
  3. that consists of states
  4. that emerged from the global economy
  5. that has a dominant hegemon

A

 

  1. Global models of what a government or an educational system should look like are part of
  2. the global polity
  3. the global economy
  4. the global culture
  5. the global social system

C

 

  1. Cultural ideas that shape the world society began in
  2. the enlightenment
  3. the 1960s cultural revolutions
  4. the 1770s with democratization
  5. English common law

A

 

  1. Awareness of shared problems causes actors in world society
  2. To form communities of interest around global topics
  3. To bring issues to the world polity in international structures such as the UN
  4. To seek global rules and regulations concerning these topics
  5. All of the above

D

 

  1. Appadurai uses the term scapes to signify that
  2. Globalization is constantly changing the world
  3. The globe can be viewed as a landscape
  4. Scape captures the static quality of globalization
  5. We need to escape processes of globalization

A

 

  1. Mediascapes refer to processes of
  2. Producing, distributing, and consuming information
  3. Technological changes brought by flows of machines
  4. Flows of capital such as in trade or foreign investment
  5. Images and information that flow form governments and social movements

A

 

  1. Technoscapes refer to
  2. Producing, distributing, and consuming information
  3. Technological changes brought by flows of machines
  4. Flows of capital such as in trade or foreign investment
  5. Images and information that flow form governments and social movements

B

 

  1. Financescapes refer to
  2. Producing, distributing, and consuming information
  3. Technological changes brought by flows of machines
  4. Flows of capital such as in trade or foreign investment
  5. Images and information that flow form governments and social movements

C

 

  1. Ideoscapes refer to
  2. Producing, distributing, and consuming information
  3. Technological changes brought by flows of machines
  4. Flows of capital such as in trade or foreign investment
  5. Images and information that flow form governments and social movements

D

 

  1. Ethnoscapes refer to
  2. Movements of people and the images they develop of other people and places
  3. Technological changes brought by flows of machines
  4. Flows of capital such as in trade or foreign investment
  5. Images and information that flow form governments and social movements

A

 

  1. The process through which societies become more alike or homogenous is
  2. Globalization
  3. coercion
  4. Convergence
  5. Familiarization

C

 

  1. Societies can be forced to change when
  2. Their environmental conditions change
  3. They are coerced by another country or international body
  4. They experience an economic shock
  5. All of the above

D

 

  1. The presence of a model may be dysfunctional when societies are trying to learn about processes and policies because
  2. The model might not be suitable for them
  3. The most prominent models may not be the most successful
  4. Less well known models may have important information
  5. All of the above

D

 

  1. When changing global cultural norms instigate change in a society, it might backfire because
  2. new norms redefine a societys responsibilities to its members
  3. the country might not have the resources to make the change successfully
  4. it saves the country from sanctions from other countries
  5. it will necessarily conflict with other societal values

B

 

  1. For Robertson and Chirico, the crux of globalization is the
  2. spread of the world capitalist system
  3. transnational capitalist class dominance
  4. growing consciousness of people of their common humanity
  5. founding of international bodies such as the UN

C

 

  1. Robertson and Chirico distinguish between
  2. communist and socialist sources of globalization
  3. economic and political sources of globalization
  4. objective and subjective sources of globalization
  5. democratic and communist sources of globalization

C

 

  1. From the global field perspective, globalization can be seen as a set of contests
  2. over economic domination
  3. over scarce resources
  4. over how we will live our lives and allow others to live theirs
  5. over political control of international organizations

C

True False

  1. New lead industries create a lot of wealth and gives nations that develop an advantage that lasts forever.
  2. True
  3. False

B

 

  1. New industries lose their advantage when other societies catch up.
  2. True
  3. False

A

 

  1. Once a society has attained world dominance it never loses it.
  2. true
  3. false

B

 

  1. A hegemon can arise from the semi-periphery when that society improves its economy.
  2. True
  3. False

A

 

  1. A global hegemon, according to the World Systems Theory makes the world more stable.
  2. True
  3. False

A

 

  1. World Society or world culture theory maintains that there is no central authority in the global society.
  2. True
  3. False

A

 

  1. Appadurai imagines globalization as flows.
  2. True
  3. False

A

 

  1. Appadurais scapes change and are changed by the people and places over which they flow.
  2. True
  3. False

A

 

  1. Societies may become more similar to one another without any consultation or coordination among them.
  2. True
  3. False

B

 

  1. Sometimes countries are forced to adopt similar policies because of external coercion.
  2. True
  3. False

A

 

  1. The idea of human rights is an important element of global culture. This means that all countries agree on exactly what human rights are.
  2. True
  3. False

B

 

  1. Rodrik argues for the importance of all countries adopting the same economic policies
  2. true
  3. false

B

 

  1. Global federalism is not feasible for the foreseeable future, according to Rodrik, because national cultures are still too distinct
  2. true
  3. false

A

 

  1. According to world systems theories, relations among countries determine their economies more than internal dynamics.
  2. True
  3. False

A

 

  1. The capitalist world economy spread as more territories were incorporated into larger commodity chains of production.
  2. True
  3. False

A

 

  1. Theorists agree that ultimately, globalization will bring world peace
  2. True
  3. False

B

 

  1. Globalization means that countries will be alike
  2. True
  3. False

B

 

  1. Hegemons provide stability to the world system by establishing rules of trade and the financial system.
  2. True
  3. False

A

 

Essay

  1. What are the four fractions of the transnational capitalist class? Explain their interdependence.

 

  1. Compare and contrast the statist and non statist models of globalization.

 

  1. Explain Becks concept of risk and where it comes from?

 

  1. Why does Rodrick maintain that political democratization is globalizing but globalization also has non democratic effects?

 

  1. What are the four elements of the global field and how are they related?

 

  1. How can the rise of fundamentalism in the latter part of the 20th century be seen both as a rejection of globalization and a form of globalization?

 

  1. Choose three of the sets of theories and discuss how each would address the problem of global poverty or another social issue.

    Multiple Choice

    1. Bretton Woods is referred to as an economic regime because
    2. it laid out a comprehensive monetary policy plan for global stability
    3. it established a single global authority for monetary policy
    4. it was backed by the United Nations
    5. it involved international organizations

    A

     

    1. Toward the end of WWII, world leaders recognized that global political stability depended on
    2. economic prosperity of all nations
    3. having a single world leader or hegemon
    4. spreading democracy across the world
    5. spreading capitalism across the world

    A

     

    1. A primary purpose of the International Monetary Fund is to promote macroeconomic stability through measures such as
    2. encouraging or financing stimulus spending
    3. Currency exchange agreements
    4. Standards for reserves in gold and currency
    5. All of the above

    D

     

    1. A major reason countries were required to keep currency and gold reserves was to ensure
    2. That societies were saving more than they spent
    3. That a country could stabilize its currency as needed
    4. That countries could loan to others when they needed loans
    5. They kept all of their reserves in dollars

    B

     

    1. A policy that the central bank of a country might use to stimulate the economy is to
    2. Raise taxes
    3. Decrease social security, unemployment and other payments
    4. Cut back on planned government projects
    5. Decrease interest rates on borrowing

    D

     

    1. One of the plans for countries to rebuild their economics following WWII was import substitution, this was to help countries
    2. Find imports that were cheaper than the ones they were currently buying
    3. Build their domestic industries
    4. Finance their central banks
    5. Contribute to increasing world trade

    B

     

    1. One of the problems facing developing countries following independence was
    2. Elite power and rule
    3. Corruption in government
    4. Underdeveloped educational and other infrastructure
    5. All of the above

    D

     

    1. A role of the International Monetary Fund is to
    2. Manage the finances of the United Nations
    3. Manage the finances of the World Bank
    4. Help countries negotiate trade agreements
    5. Help countries stimulate demand and coordinate aid activities

    D

     

    1. As part of the Bretton Woods agreements, countries agreed to
    2. Manage their currency within a range determined by its value in relation to the US dollar
    3. Enact fair trade policies
    4. Maintain a reserve
    5. All of the above

    A

     

     

    1. Bretton Woods was the worlds first real attempt to
    2. Establish a global political authority
    3. Establish ways to stabilize the global economy
    4. Bring peace through negotiations
    5. End World War II

    B

     

    1. Industries agglomerate where they think they will find
    2. Competitive advantage
    3. Lowest taxes
    4. Raw materials
    5. Cheap labor

    A

     

    1. When multinationals open production facilities in developed nations they are usually seeking
    2. Cheaper labor
    3. Less stringent environmental laws
    4. New markets
    5. Raw materials

    C

     

    1. Bretton Woods economic policies encouraged specific measures governments could take to stimulate domestic economies these include
    2. Increase spending by governments
    3. Lower interest rates to increase demand
    4. Lowering taxes
    5. All of the above

    D

     

    1. Crony capitalism is
    2. A form of modern capitalism
    3. Handing out contracts and jobs to friends, relatives and political allies
    4. Encouraged by the World Bank
    5. A way of ensuring job creation

    B

     

    1. Import substitution is a strategy of
    2. Producing for domestic markets
    3. Importing goods rather than producing them domestically
    4. Relying on trade to balance supply and demand
    5. Building a money supply through trade

    A

     

    1. Neo liberal economic policy relies heavily on
    2. Government to manage economic stability
    3. Freedom of the market
    4. Import substitution
    5. The IMF for macroeconomic stability

    B

     

    1. One of the conditions of acquiring loans imposed by the IMF and World Bank was
    2. privatization of many industries and infrastructure development
    3. Government take-over of key industries such as oil and gas
    4. Rigid trade barriers to protect domestic markets
    5. More regulation over the markets

    A

     

    1. One of the problems facing developing countries following independence was
    2. Elite power and rule
    3. Corruption in government
    4. Underdeveloped educational and other infrastructure
    5. All of the above

    D

     

    1. If corporations pay cheaper wages in other countries it may force
      1. Wages in their home country down
      2. Them to end up having greater overall cost due to shipping goods back home
      3. Them to abide by stricter environmental laws
      4. Higher taxes at home

    A

    1. Macroeconomic stability involves
    1. encouraging or financing stimulus spending
    2. trying to control currency fluctuations and exchanges
    3. Standards for reserves in gold and currency
    4. All of the above

    A

     

    1. Which is NOT a way that governments can stimulate demand?
    2. lowering interest rates
    3. shutting down production
    4. lowering taxes
    5. spending money on public projects

    B

     

    1. The strategy of import substitution is supposed to help a society develop through _____
    2. increasing peoples wages
    3. building up domestic industries to sell to the domestic market
    4. moving people from primary industry into manufacturing
    5. all of the above

    A

     

    1. Primary industry refers to _____
    2. services that are of primary importance in an economy
    3. manufacturing
    4. extracting resources such as in mining, logging, fishing and farming
    5. the earliest industries to develop in a society

    C

     

    1. Secondary industry refers to ______
    2. services that are of primary importance in an economy
    3. manufacturing
    4. extracting resources such as in mining, logging, fishing and farming
    5. the earliest industries to develop in a society

    B

     

    1. The countries with the largest percentages of their GNP from primary industry are ____
    2. Among the poorest societies
    3. Among the middle class societies
    4. Among the richest societies
    5. Found equally among poor, middle, and high income countries

    A

     

    1. Service industry jobs are ____
    2. Primarily high income jobs that require high educations
    3. Primarily low income jobs that require low levels of education
    4. Both high and low income jobs
    5. Jobs that are easily shipped overseas

    C

     

    1. In the United States, among the 20 fastest growing occupations, more jobs will be created that are
    2. Below middle class income than above
    3. Are above middle class income than below
    4. Equally divided among high paying and low paying jobs
    5. None of the above

    A

     

    1. One of the primary roles of the International Monetary Fund is to
    2. help countries stimulate demand through loans
    3. employing people from developing countries
    4. decreasing taxes in low income countries when they need more money
    5. all of the above

    A

     

    1. A method of trade liberalization is
    2. eliminating tariffs
    3. eliminating quotas
    4. eliminating subsidies
    5. all of the above

    D

     

    1. A weakness of developing countries in trade negotiations is ___
    2. having nothing to trade
    3. strong financial regulatory systems
    4. lack of know-how to negotiate trade agreements
    5. low cost production

    C

     

    1. Neo liberal economic policy relies heavily on
    2. Government to manage economic stability
    3. Freedom of the market
    4. Import substitution
    5. The IMF for macroeconomic stability

    B

     

    1. When they adopted the Washington Consensus or neo-liberal policies one the conditions of acquiring loans imposed by the IMF and World Bank was
    2. Privatizing (turning over to private enterprise) many industries that were run by government
    3. Government take-over of key industries such as oil and gas
    4. Rigid trade barriers to protect domestic markets
    5. more regulations to control the flow of money and trade

    A

    1. Among the primary reasons that US corporations move their manufacturing abroad is
    2. More stringent environmental laws
    3. Cheaper labor
    4. Better educated workforces
    5. More land for development

    B

     

    1. Off shoring refers to
    2. hiring another company to do some production processes
    3. sending work to another country
    4. sending work to another firm in another country
    5. hiring temporary employees from another country

    B

     

    1. The job that a company is least likely to be shipped overseas is
    2. accounting
    3. information technology
    4. personal care or health care aide
    5. manufacturing

    C

     

    1. The housing bubble was in part caused by
    2. mortgage instruments that made it easier for people to buy houses
    3. tax policies, like loan interest deductions, that made buying a house cheaper
    4. the belief that housing prices would only go up and never decrease
    5. all of the above

    D

     

    1. One of the ways that the housing bubble led to the financial crisis was
    2. credit among banks and companies froze
    3. companies could not borrow money to make purchases or meet payrolls
    4. bad loans were packaged with good ones and sold as mortgage derivatives and securities
    5. all of the above

    D

     

    1. The major strategy to solve the global economic crisis that nations agreed during the G20 meetings was for governments to
    2. institute stimulus measures
    3. cut back on spending drastically
    4. reduce payments to the IMF
    5. raise interest rates to discourage spending

    A

    True False

     

    1. The Soviet Union participated in Bretton Woods discussions.
    2. True
    3. False

    A

     

    1. A primary purpose of the World Bank is to help countries escape from poverty.
    2. True
    3. False

    A

     

    1. Bretton Woods institutions have been dissolved.
    2. True
    3. False

     

    1. Countries that were colonies were able to take advantage of the Industrial Revolution to pull themselves out of poverty.
    2. True
    3. False

     

    1. The World Social Forum is an annual meeting of the economic and political leaders of the world.
    2. True
    3. False

     

    1. Neo-liberalism became the dominant economic policy of the World Bank and IMF during the administrations of Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher.
    2. True
    3. False

     

    1. One of the reasons many former colonies failed to develop and prosper was corruption
    2. True
    3. False

     

    1. Tariffs are a strategy to increase the price of imported goods.
    2. True
    3. False

     

    1. At the end of 2011 many countries in the euro zone, Japan, and the United States were in debt.
    2. True
    3. False

     

    1. After stimulating their economies for a brief while following the crisis of 2008, many European countries reinstituted austerity measures.
    2. True
    3. False

    Essay

    1. Discuss several of the ways of measuring economic globalization. Which makes the best definition?

     

    1. What mechanisms does the International Monetary Fund (IMF) have to facilitate economic stability?

     

    1. Explain the changes in tax law and mortgage instruments that contributed to the housing bubble in the United States.

     

    1. Explain the different strategies that comprise austerity as opposed to stimulus measures to help a country out of a threatening recession.

     

    1. How might countries, both host and guest, benefit from foreign direct investment?

     

    1. What measures might be taken to decrease inequality among nations?

     

    1. Describe measures that have been advocated to decrease inequality within nations.

     

     

    Multiple Choice

    1. An anocracy is a term coined to describe a government that
      1. Is very authoritarian
      2. Has some characteristics of democracy and some autocracy
      3. Has all but disappeared from the world today
      4. Is found only in Asian societies

    B

     

    1. Violent conflict within states rose steadily from
      1. World War I to WW II
      2. The end of WWII to the 1970s
      3. The end of WWII to the end of the Cold War
      4. The end of the Cold War to the end of the 20th Century

    C

     

    1. During the Cold War, most of the violent conflicts within countries were
      1. Ethnic
      2. Religious
      3. Ideological
      4. Separatist

    C

     

    1. Most of the violent conflict from WWII to the present has been
      1. Between or among countries
      2. Within countries
      3. Between a state and a non-state actor
      4. Among many countries

    B

     

    1. From the end of the Cold War to 2000, over _____ people perished in violent conflict.
      1. Four million
      2. Ten million
      3. Thirty million
      4. Fifty million

    A

     

    1. An essential ingredient to overcoming the legacies of colonialism and corruption that leads to violent conflict is
      1. Wealth
      2. Elected governments
      3. Ethnic homogeneity
      4. Good governance

    D

     

    1. Most of the armed conflict since WWII has been in
      1. Eastern Europe
      2. Asia and Africa
      3. North Africa
      4. Latin America

    B

     

    1. From WWII to the end of the Cold War, violent conflict was concentrated in
      1. Dictatorships
      2. Religiously diverse countries
      3. The poorest of the poor countries
      4. Communist countries

    C

     

    1. Active separatist movements are found in
      1. The Americas
      2. Europe
      3. Africa
      4. All of the above

    D

     

    1. The breakup of Yugoslavia following the end of the Cold War
      1. Was peaceful in Croatia and Bosnia
      2. Fulfilled Titos plan for Yugoslavia
      3. Led to genocides
      4. Pit religious groups against one another rather than ethnic

    C

     

    1. Immediately following the Cold War, until about 1993,
      1. The number of ethnic conflicts increased rapidly
      2. Ideologically motivated conflicts increased rapidly
      3. Religious revolutions increased rapidly
      4. Interstate wars increased rapidly

    A

     

    1. Since independence in the 1960s and 70s violent conflict in African nations
      1. Subsided both within and among
      2. Increased within countries
      3. Has been primarily between countries
      4. Has rooted out all of the terrorist factions

    B

     

    1. The first sitting President to be arrested and tried for genocide was
      1. Slobodan Milosevic
      2. Augusto Pinochet
      3. Daniel Ortega
      4. Joseph Stalin

    A

    1. The greatest casualties of contemporary violent conflict is among
      1. Soldiers
      2. Terrorists
      3. Women and children
      4. The elderly

    C

     

    1. The religious group that came to control most of Afghanistan in the 1990s was
      1. al Qaeda
      2. The Taliban
      3. al Shabaab
      4. Houthi

    B

     

    1. In the United States and globally, most terrorism during the 1960s 1990 was terrorism related to
      1. Religious groups
      2. The ideological left
      3. Ethnic groups
      4. Fundamentalist groups

    B

     

    1. Terrorism of the 1960s through to the 1990s was dominated by
      1. Loosely organized networks
      2. Lone wolves
      3. Sleeper cells
      4. Formal groups

    D

     

    1. Peace-building efforts include
      1. Power sharing
      2. Working cooperatively on common projects
      3. Respecting local customs
      4. All of the above

    D

     

    1. Establishing democracy after autocratic rule
      1. Is usually easily accomplished because people want it
      2. Requires strong legitimate institutions such as a judiciary
      3. Leads to long periods of peace
      4. Always follows independence

    B

     

    1. Technology facilitates increases in the international crime of
      1. Counterfeiting
      2. Drug trafficking
      3. Economic espionage
      4. All of the above

    D

     

    1. People are especially vulnerable to human trafficking due to
      1. Greed
      2. Materialism
      3. Poverty
      4. Ethnicity

    C

     

    1. To be identified as a Transnational Organized Crime group, there must be
      1. More than one type of crime
      2. Three or more persons
      3. Political benefit
      4. Racketeering

    B

     

    1. An example of legal activity that aids and abets international organized crime is
      1. Slavery is legal in some countries
      2. Selling children is legal in some countries
      3. Hiding money is legal in some countries
      4. Corruption is legal in some countries

    C

     

    1. Which of these is not a priority of Interpol?
      1. Financial and high tech crimes
      2. Human trafficking
      3. Manslaughter
      4. Corruption

    C

     

    1. Human trafficking nets international criminals about ____ annually
      1. $10 billion
      2. $20 billion
      3. $30 billion
      4. $40 billion

    A

     

    1. About how many people are trafficked across borders annually?
      1. 100,000 300,000
      2. 200,000 500,000
      3. 600,000 900,000
      4. 1,000,000 2,000,000

    C

     

    1. Which of these countries has NOT been destabilized by drug trafficking
      1. Colombia
      2. Brazil
      3. Honduras
      4. Mexico

    B

     

    1. Cyber-attacks have been practiced
      1. Only by hackers working individually
      2. Only for financial gain
      3. By one government against another
      4. Only within countries

    C

     

    1. A strategy whereby a websites are flooded so that legitimate traffic cannot get through is called
      1. A Trojan horse
      2. Denial of service
      3. Swooshing
      4. Phishing

    B

     

    1. A large portion of the guns that Mexican drug cartels use come from
      1. Venezuela
      2. Cuba
      3. The United States
      4. Colombia

    C

     

    True False

     

    1. A democracy with a GDP of at least $6000 per capita has statistically no chance of collapsing.
      1. True
      2. False

    A

     

    1. Good governance ensures prosperity.
      1. True
      2. False

    B

     

    1. Since WWII, genocide has been confined to Africa.
      1. True
      2. False

    B

     

    1. When the USSR dissolved the national boundaries between the former soviets was not controversial and was settled non-violently.
      1. True
      2. False

    B

     

    1. Drug trafficking is more profitable for international crime than human trafficking.
      1. True
      2. False

    A

     

    1. The volume of domestic human trafficking globally exceeds cross-border human trafficking.
      1. True
      2. False

    A

     

    1. Children are vulnerable to being kidnapped from many refugee camps.
      1. True
      2. False

    A

     

    1. Most security analysts believe that the infrastructure of developed countries is secure from cyber-attacks.
      1. True
      2. False

    B

     

    1. A strategy to combat drug trafficking that has had some success is providing farmers with more profitable cash crops and market.
      1. True
      2. False

    A

     

    1. West Africa is a hub for drug trafficking
      1. True
      2. False

    A

     

    1. A number of terrorist organizations make money by drug trafficking
      1. True
      2. False

    A

     

    Essay

     

    1. Explain the social structural roots of violence relevant to governments.

     

    1. Many factors make for vulnerability to violent conflict within a state. Discuss these factors and their interplay.

     

    1. Explain the four categories along which state fragility are measured or assessed by the Center for Global Policy and Systemic Peace.

     

    1. How are children vulnerable to being recruited, kidnapped or in other ways coming to be used as soldiers?

     

    1. Explain the strategies that USAID uses to combat international crime in developing countries.

     

    1. What steps can be taken to improve the capacity of governments to fight international organized crime?

     

    1. What strategies have been used successfully to build peace after violent conflict?

     

     

     

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